Beyond IQ

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Upcoming events

    • 25 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 17 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 17 sessions
    • Online
    • 5
    Registration is closed

    Bread and Circuses: Hunger Games, Oppression, and Resistance

    Mondays, 12:15 pm Eastern; starts January 25th.

    Children vs. children sounds absolutely horrific – and it is, it must be, because that kind of horror is a tool to create the oppressive atmosphere of a controlling authoritarian government.  At the same time it provides the kind of dramatic mind-consuming entertainment the privileged in such a nation must experience to keep them placated.

    Suzanne Collins Hunger Games series explores oppression and the inevitable resistance that rises out of such oppression..  The parallels to historical examples, particularly the Roman Empire, and much of the modern world, abound. In this course we’ll explore those parallels, working towards understanding effective resistance, and examining some of the problems that arise in revolution.  We’ll discuss Roman gladiators and reality television as different aspects of the same circus.

     

    We’ll also delve into the developments that might lead from our current world to the world of Hunger Games, scientifically, environmentally, economically, and otherwise.  We’ll explore psychology, sociology, technology, biology, and architecture all through the lens of the books.

     

    In this first course of the series, we will focus most on the tools of oppression used by authoritarian regimes as displayed in Hunger Games.  

     

    Each week, we will compare some aspect of our reading to a particular historical or current event. 

    Syllabus:

     

    Day 1:

    Chapter 1

    Main comparison: Setting compared to current US, looking forward, what kind of apocalypse might have happened?

    Topics:  Setting analysis, hunting ethics, cat symbolism historically, character analysis – Gale and Katniss, introduction to resistance, class divisions.

     

    Day 2:

     Chapters 2 and 3

    Main comparison: -NAI kids taking for education

    Topics: The use of children  in oppression.  Role of the games in control.  Symbolism and the importance of symbols.  Sister relationships.  Technology analysis.  Role of tributes – comparison to sacrifices, Celctic rites.

     

    Day 3:

    Chapters 4-5

    Main comparison:  Alcoholism – both as a means of oppression and as a means of self-medication

    Topics:  Addiction and alcoholism as forms of control, also in modern society .  Analysis of what we know of the district 13 rebellion.  Comparison – capitol vs. US culture.  Name analyses.  Circuses throughout history.  The role of appearance and fashion in culture and media.

     

    Day 4: 

    Chapters 6 and 7

    Main comparison: White saviorism. 

    Topics:  The role of story.  Coal and diamonds.  Avoxes – naming and maiming and oppression.  Rebelliousness as entertainment.  Talent and experience.

     

    Day 5: 

    Chapters 8 and 9

    Main comparison: Gladiators – 1st half of Spartacus        

    Topics:  Ratings analysis.  Relationships in YA books vs. reality.  Performance, interviews as entertainment.

     

    Day 6:

    Chapters 10 and 11

    Main comparison: Poverty theater as a current issue.

    Topics:  Symbolism revisited.  Poverty theater and putting names and faces on issues to gain support, psychological impact of witnessing murder, technology and architecture of the arena,  using alliances as leverage – turning an ally.

     

    Day 7:

    Chapters 12, 13, and 14

    Main comparison: Chemical warfare

    Topics: Analysis of technology/architecture of arena continued.  Psychological impact of being forced to kill someone.  History – drugs/mind-altering substances as weapons.  The use or shortages as a means of control.

     

    Day 8:

    Chapters 15, 16

    Main comparison:  Slavery and colonialism (globally)

    Topics:  District oppression techniques.  Music, culture, and oppression of culture.  Hunger as a warfare tactic.

     

    Day 9:

    Chapters 17, 18

    Main comparison:  Reality television

    Topics:  Survival skills analysis.  Reality television analysis.  How is love resistance?    Immigration issues around hunger and oppression.  Poverty and generosity.

     

    Day 10:

    Chapters 19, 20

    Main comparison: Political theater and elections

    Paparazzi, politics (political theater), blood poisoning, symbolism and berries 

     

    Day 11:

    Chapters 21, 22

    Main Comparison:   Spartacus part 2.

    Topics: Illusion of fairness, rules, why do romances capture our imagination.

     

    Day 12:

    Chapters 23, 24

    Main comparison:  Scarcity tactics

    Topics: Implications of winning and oppression of the victors.  Comparison of the Western preoccupation with romance to how women are treated in some muslim countries – is it oppression or cultural differences?

     

    Day 13:

    Chapters 25, 26

    Main comparison:  Psychological warfare

    Topics:  Bioengineering, muttations, psychological warfare, changing the rules as oppression.

     

    Day 14:

    Chapter 27

    Main comparison:  China under Mao Tse Tung

    Book vs. movie – watch party.  Conclusions about Bread and Circuses.

     

    Day 15:

    Review, student work, final thoughts.


    • 25 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 24 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • online
    • 4
    Registration is closed

    InstructorSherene Raisbeck
    4 students MAXIMUM
    Suggested Ages: eligible to take the exam within 6 months
    Meets: 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm,  Eastern Time

    DESCRIPTION

    This is an opportunity for students working on their GED or HiSet to access tutoring in a small group.  Your student may attend any or all of the 15 hours over the term for a fixed rate. Maximum enrollment of 4 students per session.

    I own a variety of test prep curricula, but feel free to check to see if I own the one your student is using.

    $325; GHF, SENG, MAGE, and NHAGE Members pay $310! Single sessions $25,  subject to availability.

    *** note that we will take a two week break -- no meetings April 5 & 12 ***

    • 26 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 11 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • Online
    Registration is closed

    Talking Back To Statistics - please note, this time is MIDNIGHT Eastern, until DST starts, then it will be 1:00 am.

    This is a Hong Kong and Australia friendly time!


    What do you mean by those numbers?  Do they say what you're trying to tell me they say?  Are you hiding something?  Where did they come from anyway? 

    In a world filled with data, one of the most important skills we can develop is thinking critically about that data - finding the inherent bias in all data.  We are going to interrogate data!

    We will look at many example of data in all it stages, mostly real, some crafted to demonstrate the issues that can arise. We will read How to Lie with Statistics by Darrell Huff (available free online). Students will try their hands at the art of data manipulation. Students are not expected to have prior knowledge of statistics – content required to understand manipulation will be taught alongside the actual manipulation, however, the focus of the course is on the bias and manipulation over the content itself, so students who come with no statistics background may find they need to work more outside of class on the material. Students will learn how to collect, analyze, represent, and interpret data, but the focus is on how bias is introduced when we do this, and how to ask questions of data to try to determine what the truth really is.  This class will be heavy in discussion, with accommodations made for students who prefer to take more time to think before responding.  

    PrerequisitesNone

    All times are in Eastern Time.  There will be one break week.

    SYLLABUS:

    Week 1: Introduction to statistics, pre-assessment, discussion of “What is fair?” 

    Week 2: Questionnaires, leading questions, question order, background information 

    Week 3: Sampling methods, why sampling is important, when sampling goes wrong 

    Week 4: Science and data gathering – the importance of the control, changing a single variable, basic experimental design 

    Week 5:  The concept of “average” – mean median, mode, when to use each, when to be sure which one you’re hearing 

    Week 6: Data analysis beyond the average – other methods of crunching the numbers, what they mean, and what they don’t.  Margin of error. 

    Week 7:  Graphs week 1 – ways to display those numbers that trick the eyes! 

    Week 8:  Graphs week 2 – more ways to make those numbers look all out of whack! 

    Week 9 The semi-attached figure – getting people to think what you want by showing them something else. 

    Week 10: Post hoc ergo propter hoc – correlation vs. causation 

    Week 11: Logical fallacies continued – a look at other logical fallacies and how they can impact thinking about data and statistics. 

    Week 12: Statisculation – a review of some of the other nasty things people can do, sometimes without even realizing it! 

    Week 13: Summary of talking back to a statistic, development of steps to ensure you have examined a statistic well. A chance to really tackle some good examples! 

    Week 14: A week built in to go off on tangents that arise, make-up anything we fall behind on, or explore something the students wish to explore. 

    Week 15: Wrap up discussion, sharing of projects.


    • 27 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 12 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • online
    • 11
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Chris Buck

    Wednesdays at 1:00 pm Eastern, 15 weeks, starting January 27th.

    Explore the nature of programming and code by exploring and creating digital artifacts.

    1. Designing self-symmetric objects and using objects in a frieze or wallpaper pattern. Models include: 2D position, 2D rotation, rotational and reflectional symmetry.

    2. Recreate the Game of Life, Pong, and Asteroids. Models include: clock time, ticks, 1D and 2D automata, and user interaction.

    3. Create an animation. Models include: lighting, 3D meshes, color, and transparency.
    • 28 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 20 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 17 sessions
    • Online
    • 10

    InstructorEmma Sobey
    5-10 students
    Suggested Ages: 13+ years old
    Meets:
     Thursdays at 11:15 am, 17 weeks. Starts Jan. 28th.

    CLASS DESCRIPTION:

    Successful creative writing starts with learning how to be an effective writer.  Great writing  takes revision, practice, and valuable feedback to help a writer develop their communication skills.  Whether you are interested in improving your ability to write fiction, poetry, or even academic writing, this course can help you hone your skills and develop your writing by engaging in interesting, fun, and effective activities geared towards developing you as a writer! 

    In this course, you can expect to read, write, and discuss the elements of great creative writing in a safe, open, and supportive environment.  You will learn how to improve your writing by crafting your words in new and interesting ways!

    Course Overview:

    Week:1 Hopes and Dreams—What do I want to learn about Creative Writing?

    Week 2: What makes a good story?

    Week 3: It’s all about Me:  Writing Literary Fiction Introduction (What makes good Literary Fiction?)

    Week 4:  I am the STAR!  Writing a story about yourself

    Week 5:  Peer Editing and Revision

    Week 6:  Finishing Touches

    Week 7:  Tales and Adventures:  Examining Short Story Structures

    Week 8:  Creating realistic characters

    Week 9:  Adding Descriptive Language

    Week 10:  Using Effective Writing

    Week 11:  Conflicts

     Week 12:  Peer Editing and Revision

    Week 13:  Writing Poetry Using Structured Poem

    Week 14:  Writing Poetry Using Free Verse

    Week 15:  Refining your Poetry

    Week 16: Exhibiting your work with a Pecha Kucha

    Week 17:  Presentations!!!!


    • 28 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 13 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • Online
    • 11
    Registration is closed

    Thursdays, 11:00 am Eastern.

    In Part 2, we’ll continue our study of the science and literature of Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality. We’ll work on improving our own abilities as rationalists, and exploring the ideas behind humanism as well. We will move a little more quickly through the chapters than we did in part 1, as the science isn’t quite as dense, so be prepared to read more each week.

    Because the science isn’t as dense, the storyline gets richer, and departs more from the original books. We will spend less time doing direct comparisons to the original text, though topics will crop up from time to time, and more time focused on how these characters grow, what puzzles they are presented with, and where it all might be leading. Also, we’ll start seeing some comparisons to other works as well.

    Major themes in this section include geek references, friendship and trust, definitions of evil and morality, beliefs about death, and "the game."

    We will complete “books” 2 and 3 of HPMOR, or Chapters 23-64 of the entire book.

    As before, science is more than a set of facts. We will work to expand our scientific thinking.

    Total class time is 15 sessions. There will be one week off.

    All times are U.S. East Coast. 

    Students will have access to class recordings the day after each class.

    Syllabus:

    Chapters are indicated first by individual book chapter number, then by complete text chapter number. 

    Day 1 – Purposeful Complexity

    Introduction to main themes of the course, Punnet Squares and heritability, DNA, natural selection vs intelligent engineering, chromosonal crossover, belief in belief,  evolutionary origins of human intelligence, The Tragedy of Light, the relationship between rationality and science, chimpanzee politics, Norman Maier and problems vs solutions, Robyn Dawes and hard problems, brainstorming, Harry testing his hypotheses, and why is that third chapter written in that order anyway?

    Book 2, chapters 2 (23), 3 (24), and 4 (25)

    Day 2 – Dissociative Talent

    Physics of heat transfer, the power of prophecy, diversification, Douglas Adams on impossible and improbable, the concept of noticing confusion, The Massacre of Albania in the 15th Century, Roger Bacon, understanding others/empathy, the puzzle of what the Weasley twins did, levels of deception

    Book 2, chapters 5 (26) and 6 (27)

    Day 3 – Logically Impossible

    Reverse engineering, nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes (buckytubes), geosynchronous orbit, covalent bonds, societal expectations at different ages, quantum mechanics and timeless physics, parietal cortex, veil of Maya, seven point alchemal diagram, conspiracy theories and Lee Harvey Oswald, in-depth character contrasts

    Book 2, chapters 7 (28) and 8 (29)

    Day 4 – The Enemy’s Gate is Sideways

    So many geek references that it gets listed here as a topic, Robbers Cave experiment, analysis of the leaders’ speeches, analysis of the leaders themselves, using experimentation to prepare for battle, role of women, role of confusion in rationalism, knowing your audience

    Book 2, chapters 9 (30), 10 (31), and 11 (32)

    Day 5 – Learning Far too Fast

    Again with the geek references, Procopius and chariot racing, Everto and conservation of mass, Franz Ferdinand and WWI, Prisoner’s Dilemma, morality and governments, Newcomb’s Problem, recursion, autoimmune disorders/clever viruses/the battle, understanding that point system, speech analysis and politics, fasces and fascists, Rise and Fall of the Third Reich, democracy and elections,

    Book 2, chapters 12 (33), 13 (34) and 14 (35)

    Day 6 – Toys? I Love Toys!

    International Index Funds/Berkshire Hathaway, code switching, Humean Projectivism, Harry’s thinking on death, parent/child relationships and messages, catching up on anything we’ve fallen behind on at this point.

    Book 2, chapters 15 (36) and 16 (37) – end of book 2.

    Day 7 – The Puzzle that Makes the Scientist

    The Quibbler, Lucius and the Game, evidence to discriminate between possibilities, benefits of note-taking, censorship vs. common sense, definitions of evil, analysis of Voldemort as cunning, the concept of pretending to be wise as pattern completion, inductive proofs, cognitive dissonance, moral development, logical tautologies, death: Harry, Dumbledore, theories in other cultures, near death experiences, brain damage and faith

    Book 3: chapters 1 (38), 2 (39) and 3 (40)

    Day 8 – Look Toward the Painful Thought

    Frontal lobe of the brain, “tiny rump part” of the brain, peregrine falcons, Drago and Hermione, Harry and the dementors, uncontrolled fusion reactors, continuing the conversation about Harry and death

    Book 3, chapters 4 (41), 5 (42), 6 (43), 7 (44), and 8 (45)

    Day 9 –Too Weird for any Normal Plots Confirmation bias – again!, layers of the earth and how we know, Mariana Trench, interpretations of prophecy, angle of incidence/reflection, blue krait, Stalin’s Russia and views on the West, the “I have a dream” speech and white supremacy parallels, language and sentience, analyzing Draco’s story

    Book 3, chapters 9 (46), 10 (47)

    Day 10 – I  Told You to be Nicer!

    Parrot protolanguage – Irene Pepperburg, evolution of language in humans, exponential progressions, scope insensitivity, estimating total blades of grass in the world, defending one’s self vs. being above social conventions, the power other’s perceptions of us have over us, plausible deniability, justification of actions (again), secure passwords, wiping out smallpox

    Book 3, chapters 11 (48), 12 (49), 13 (50), and 14 (51)

    Day 11 – Precious and Irreplaceable

    The Stanford Prison Experiment, geography and Azkaban, memories changing in retrospect, magic resonating, morality and the Azkaban guards, Harry’s way of overcoming cognitive bias, practicing examining and changing our own thinking

    Book 3, chapters 15 (52), 16 (53), 17 (54), and 18 (55)

    Day 12 – Ways to Hide from Death

    Cooling and reviving people, constrained cognition and our own thinking, risk and mathematics, rocket science, Aristotelian vs Newtonian physics, speed and acceleration analysis, terminal velocity, problem solving

    Book 3, chapters 19 (56), 20 (57), 21 (58), and 22 (59)

    Day 13 – Sensibilities Less Offended by the Dark Lord

    Theories on criminal justice, Quirrell’s politics (again), the paradox in this part, Harry’s questions, Newton’s third law, cryptography, what is a “muggle artifact”?, Dumbledore’s methods, Harry and Quirrell’s similarities and differences, being unlike children your own age, war/dementors/our own weapons

    Book 3, chapters 23 (60), 24 (61), and 25 (62)

    Day 14 – 3 out of 40 Subjects

    The sun’s life expectancy, following all the reasoning here using Bayesian logic, fractal structures, scarcity effects, proton decay, sunk costs vs. moral actions, cost benefit calculation, Milgram revisited and evolutionary psychology, being the 3 out of 40, the person you truly are

    Book 3, chapter 26 (63)

    Day 15 – Understand

    Sharing our assignment work, practicing our rationality, and catching up on anything still needed.

    Assignments:

    1: This is a group assignment – work to create an encyclopedia of geek references in HPMOR.  Contribute the ones you know, look things up to help if you suspect something.

    2: Create your own battle, using a scientific/neuroscience/social science topic as a plot device.  (Write, or outline, or whatever works for you).

    3: Cognitive Bias assignment (to be explained later)

    4: Criminal Justice assignment (to be explained later)


    • 28 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 13 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • Online
    Registration is closed

    What do you mean by those numbers?  Do they say what you're trying to tell me they say?  Are you hiding something?  Where did they come from anyway? 

    In a world filled with data, one of the most important skills we can develop is thinking critically about that data - finding the inherent bias in all data.  We are going to interrogate data!

    We will look at many example of data in all it stages, mostly real, some crafted to demonstrate the issues that can arise. We will read How to Lie with Statistics by Darrell Huff (available free online). Students will try their hands at the art of data manipulation. Students are not expected to have prior knowledge of statistics – content required to understand manipulation will be taught alongside the actual manipulation, however, the focus of the course is on the bias and manipulation over the content itself, so students who come with no statistics background may find they need to work more outside of class on the material. Students will learn how to collect, analyze, represent, and interpret data, but the focus is on how bias is introduced when we do this, and how to ask questions of data to try to determine what the truth really is.  This class will be heavy in discussion, with accommodations made for students who prefer to take more time to think before responding.  

    PrerequisitesNone

    All times are in Pacific Time.  There will be one break week.

    SYLLABUS:

    Week 1: Introduction to statistics, pre-assessment, discussion of “What is fair?” 

    Week 2: Questionnaires, leading questions, question order, background information 

    Week 3: Sampling methods, why sampling is important, when sampling goes wrong 

    Week 4: Science and data gathering – the importance of the control, changing a single variable, basic experimental design 

    Week 5:  The concept of “average” – mean median, mode, when to use each, when to be sure which one you’re hearing 

    Week 6: Data analysis beyond the average – other methods of crunching the numbers, what they mean, and what they don’t.  Margin of error. 

    Week 7:  Graphs week 1 – ways to display those numbers that trick the eyes! 

    Week 8:  Graphs week 2 – more ways to make those numbers look all out of whack! 

    Week 9 The semi-attached figure – getting people to think what you want by showing them something else. 

    Week 10: Post hoc ergo propter hoc – correlation vs. causation 

    Week 11: Logical fallacies continued – a look at other logical fallacies and how they can impact thinking about data and statistics. 

    Week 12: Statisculation – a review of some of the other nasty things people can do, sometimes without even realizing it! 

    Week 13: Summary of talking back to a statistic, development of steps to ensure you have examined a statistic well. A chance to really tackle some good examples! 

    Week 14: A week built in to go off on tangents that arise, make-up anything we fall behind on, or explore something the students wish to explore. 

    Week 15: Wrap up discussion, sharing of projects.


    • 28 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 20 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 17 sessions
    • Online
    • 10
    Registration is closed

    Bread and Circuses: Hunger Games, Oppression, and Resistance

    Thursdays, 2:15 pm Eastern; starts January 28th.

    Children vs. children sounds absolutely horrific – and it is, it must be, because that kind of horror is a tool to create the oppressive atmosphere of a controlling authoritarian government.  At the same time it provides the kind of dramatic mind-consuming entertainment the privileged in such a nation must experience to keep them placated.

    Suzanne Collins Hunger Games series explores oppression and the inevitable resistance that rises out of such oppression..  The parallels to historical examples, particularly the Roman Empire, and much of the modern world, abound. In this course we’ll explore those parallels, working towards understanding effective resistance, and examining some of the problems that arise in revolution.  We’ll discuss Roman gladiators and reality television as different aspects of the same circus.

     

    We’ll also delve into the developments that might lead from our current world to the world of Hunger Games, scientifically, environmentally, economically, and otherwise.  We’ll explore psychology, sociology, technology, biology, and architecture all through the lens of the books.

     

    In this first course of the series, we will focus most on the tools of oppression used by authoritarian regimes as displayed in Hunger Games.  

     

    Each week, we will compare some aspect of our reading to a particular historical or current event. 

    Syllabus:

     

    Day 1:

    Chapter 1

    Main comparison: Setting compared to current US, looking forward, what kind of apocalypse might have happened?

    Topics:  Setting analysis, hunting ethics, cat symbolism historically, character analysis – Gale and Katniss, introduction to resistance, class divisions.

     

    Day 2:

     Chapters 2 and 3

    Main comparison: -NAI kids taking for education

    Topics: The use of children  in oppression.  Role of the games in control.  Symbolism and the importance of symbols.  Sister relationships.  Technology analysis.  Role of tributes – comparison to sacrifices, Celctic rites.

     

    Day 3:

    Chapters 4-5

    Main comparison:  Alcoholism – both as a means of oppression and as a means of self-medication

    Topics:  Addiction and alcoholism as forms of control, also in modern society .  Analysis of what we know of the district 13 rebellion.  Comparison – capitol vs. US culture.  Name analyses.  Circuses throughout history.  The role of appearance and fashion in culture and media.

     

    Day 4: 

    Chapters 6 and 7

    Main comparison: White saviorism. 

    Topics:  The role of story.  Coal and diamonds.  Avoxes – naming and maiming and oppression.  Rebelliousness as entertainment.  Talent and experience.

     

    Day 5: 

    Chapters 8 and 9

    Main comparison: Gladiators – 1st half of Spartacus        

    Topics:  Ratings analysis.  Relationships in YA books vs. reality.  Performance, interviews as entertainment.

     

    Day 6:

    Chapters 10 and 11

    Main comparison: Poverty theater as a current issue.

    Topics:  Symbolism revisited.  Poverty theater and putting names and faces on issues to gain support, psychological impact of witnessing murder, technology and architecture of the arena,  using alliances as leverage – turning an ally.

     

    Day 7:

    Chapters 12, 13, and 14

    Main comparison: Chemical warfare

    Topics: Analysis of technology/architecture of arena continued.  Psychological impact of being forced to kill someone.  History – drugs/mind-altering substances as weapons.  The use or shortages as a means of control.

     

    Day 8:

    Chapters 15, 16

    Main comparison:  Slavery and colonialism (globally)

    Topics:  District oppression techniques.  Music, culture, and oppression of culture.  Hunger as a warfare tactic.

     

    Day 9:

    Chapters 17, 18

    Main comparison:  Reality television

    Topics:  Survival skills analysis.  Reality television analysis.  How is love resistance?    Immigration issues around hunger and oppression.  Poverty and generosity.

     

    Day 10:

    Chapters 19, 20

    Main comparison: Political theater and elections

    Paparazzi, politics (political theater), blood poisoning, symbolism and berries 

     

    Day 11:

    Chapters 21, 22

    Main Comparison:   Spartacus part 2.

    Topics: Illusion of fairness, rules, why do romances capture our imagination.

     

    Day 12:

    Chapters 23, 24

    Main comparison:  Scarcity tactics

    Topics: Implications of winning and oppression of the victors.  Comparison of the Western preoccupation with romance to how women are treated in some muslim countries – is it oppression or cultural differences?

     

    Day 13:

    Chapters 25, 26

    Main comparison:  Psychological warfare

    Topics:  Bioengineering, muttations, psychological warfare, changing the rules as oppression.

     

    Day 14:

    Chapter 27

    Main comparison:  China under Mao Tse Tung

    Book vs. movie – watch party.  Conclusions about Bread and Circuses.

     

    Day 15:

    Review, student work, final thoughts.


    • 28 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 13 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • Online
    Registration is closed


    Instructor: Josh Shaine

    Ages: 13+

    Meets: Thursdays, 4pm EST/EDT; 15 weeks, starting Jan. 28th

    Welcome to Fantasy. This genre of literature tries to explore what the world would be like if there were magic in the world, in one form or another.  Whether that comes from powers that an individual (magicians, witches, sorcerers, etc.) has; the presence of divergent beings (elves, gnomes, changelings, etc.), strange animals (unicorns, gryphons, rocs, etc.), or some other elements, it is the essence of magic that ties them together, usually. Exploring this field -- which may take the form of novels, short stories, essays, movies, TV shows, games, or websites – carries the reader/participant into impossible worlds, often filled with wonders that stretch the imagination.

    Over the course of the term, we will discuss a broad variety of types of fantasy, while reading (hearing), watching, and looking at examples (good and bad) that illustrate those types. With one exception, all materials will be available on line at no cost for people within the United States. I expect that I can make them available for others if they should not be accessible from other countries.

    We will have a few exercises along the way. Any writing or presentations you do will receive feedback. If you are willing, I would like to share it with the class.

    Regardless, the number one goal is to have fun!

    PrerequisitesNone

    There will be one break week.

    SYLLABUS:

    Week 1: Introduction; Discussion of Syllabus; Sub-genres

    Week 2: Just Add Dragons – Alternate Histories born of fantasy; Exercise One: Explaining Technology

    Week 3: The Major Races of Fantasy

    Week 4: Mixing Animals and Humans

    Week 5: Medieval Europe as a Basis for Fantasy; Exercise Two: The Project

    Week 6: Fairy Tales and Mythology

    Week 7: Religion as a Basis for Fantasy

    Week 8: Magic the Destroyer; Magic the Creator

    Week 9: What’s Your Fantasy doing on My Alien World?

    Week 10: The Rise of Romance

    Week 11: Urban Fantasy

    Week 12: The Hero’s Journey, Lord of the Rings, and How They Changed the Field

    Week 13: Harry Potter and How He Changed the Field

    Week 14: “Where Do We Go From Here?”

    Week 15: Presentations; Summation


    • 29 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 28 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • online
    • 8
    Registration is closed

    InstructorSherene Raisbeck
    5-10 students
    Suggested Ages: 10-15
    Meets: Fridays 10:00am - 11:00pm,  Eastern Time

    $325; GHF, SENG, MAGE, and NHAGE Members pay $310!

    *** We will take a two week break -- no meetings 4/9 or 4/16 ***

    We accept charter school funds

    DESCRIPTION

    We will be using the book Thinking Physics, but I recommend that students NOT purchase the book before taking the course. This is an introduction to conceptual physics which does not require much math and absolutely does not require calculus. Because one of the main goals is to develop accurate physics intuition, our discussions of the problems will acknowledge and discuss common errors of thinking while we develop the conceptual tools necessary for later application of mathematical tools to solving physics problems. No homework though your student may beg to have the book after they have completed the course!

    Find Thinking Physics at your library, your favorite bookseller, or here.

    SYLLABUS

    Problem based discussion course, we will not discuss every problem in the book, but we will discuss a sampling from all topic areas.

    Topics:
    Kinematics
    Newton's Laws of Motion
    Momentum and Energy
    Rotation
    Gravity
    Fluids
    Heat
    Vibrations
    Light
    Electricity & Magnetism
    Relativity
    Quanta


    • 29 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 28 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • online
    • 8
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Sherene Raisbeck

    Suggested ages: 8-11 (not for junior high)

    Fridays, 11:30am-1:00pm; starting January 29th

    *** We will take a two week break -- no meetings April 9 or April 16 ***

    Einstein Adds a New Dimension is the third of three works in Joy Hakim's Story of Science that present the major scientific innovations within the context of major works produced by Aristotle, Newton, Einstein, and progress which continues in theoretical physics.

    Learning how to make accurate and useful observations, investigate ideas, evaluate sources, and find out what’s really true, are important skills for scholars in all fields of endeavor.

    Students in Einstein Adds a New Dimension continue to develop their understanding of the historical context and great experiments of the world’s innovators.

    As the third part of The Story of Science series, Einstein Adds a New Dimension builds on the foundation set forward in the courses Aristotle Leads the Way and Newton at the Center.  Einstein Adds a New Dimension guides students through discoveries in modern physics, explaining the state of the science, while describing some of the current questions and areas of research.  Building on the themes in courses Aristotle and NewtonEinstein Adds a New Dimension helps students strengthen their solid basis of understanding, understand the nature and pace of change, and develop the insight, imagination, and skill to anticipate, jump in, and move forward with the new work of the future.

    Over the course of the year, we will explore the lines of evidence for the current theory of the universe; we will discover the nature of quarks and strings; and we will discuss alternative hypotheses and theories.  We will continue building the scaffold for later studies in science and other endeavors, and developing skills which will be used in career planning and development.

    This course will be using additional material from Thinking Physics by Lewis Carroll Epstein, but students are not required to have this book.

    Tests, homework, and grades are provided optionally and may be graded at home or by the instructor.  We fully support 2e students and will tailor testing, homework, and class participation so that it is low stress and meaningful for each student.  Students need to be able to do multiplication with fractions and ratios, and to understand the use of algebraic symbols.

    While some experiments are repeated from the Newton and Aristotle courses, students will encounter them on a different level. These courses do NOT need to be taken in a particular order.

    Find the Einstein Adds a New Dimension book here.

    Times listed are Eastern! 


    • 29 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 14 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • online
    • 7
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Josh Shaine

    Fridays at 12:30 pm Eastern, 15 weeks, starting January 29th

    This will be a fast moving survey of world history, covering many centuries in far too short a period. Lots of reading/listening between sessions. While we will be approach this term chronologically, there will be opportunities for side excursions into specific topics, regions, or events for interested students. 

    If you will want a grade for this course, please discuss it with me at the beginning of the course (or before).

    Rough Outline:

    1. Setting the Stage - The World in 1400 CE
    2. 1400-1450 CE
    3. 1450 - 1500 CE
    4. 1500 - 1550 CE
    5. 1550 - 1600 CE
    6. 1600 - 1650 CE
    7. 1650 - 1700 CE
    8. 1700 - 1750 CE
    9. 1750 - 1800 CE
    10. 1800 - 1850 CE
    11. 1850 - 1900 CE
    12. 1900 - 1950 CE part 1
    13. 1900 - 1950 CE part 2
    14. 1900 - 1950 CE part 3
    15. Presentations and Wrap-Up

    All dates are approximate!

    Recommended texts: The Cambridge World History: Volume 6, The Construction of a Global World, 1400–1800 CE, Part 1 & 2
    The Cambridge World History: Volume 7, Production, Destruction and Connection, 1750–Present, Part 1 & 2 

    • 29 Jan 2021
    • (EST)
    • 28 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 18 sessions
    • online
    • 8
    Registration is closed

    This course is a continuation of Part 1 and cannot be taken without having taken the prior course. Email to <courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org> if you wish to take Part 1 and it is not listed.


    InstructorSherene Raisbeck
    5-10 students
    Suggested Ages: 10-15
    Meets: Fridays 2:30pm - 3:30pm,  Eastern Time

    $325; GHF, SENG, MAGE, and NHAGE Members pay $310!

    *** We will take a two week break -- no meetings April 9 or April 16 ***

    We accept charter school funds

    DESCRIPTION

    We will be using the book Thinking Physics, but I recommend that students NOT read the book before taking the course. This is an introduction to conceptual physics which does not require much math and absolutely does not require calculus. Because one of the main goals is to develop accurate physics intuition, our discussions of the problems will acknowledge and discuss common errors of thinking while we develop the conceptual tools necessary for later application of mathematical tools to solving physics problems. No homework though your student may beg to read the book after they have completed the course!

    Find Thinking Physics at your library, your favorite bookseller, or here.

    SYLLABUS

    Problem based discussion course, we will not discuss every problem in the book, but we will discuss a sampling from all topic areas.

    Topics:
    Kinematics
    Newton's Laws of Motion
    Momentum and Energy
    Rotation
    Gravity
    Fluids
    Heat
    Vibrations
    Light
    Electricity & Magnetism
    Relativity
    Quanta


    • 02 Feb 2021
    • (EST)
    • 18 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • 9
    Registration is closed

    InstructorSkia Laurence
    5-10 students
    Suggested Ages: 13+ years old
    Meets: Tuesdays at 11:00 am, 15 weeks. Starts February 2nd.

    CLASS DESCRIPTION:

    Calling lovers of all things nautical. Come, gain some real understanding of the high seas. This is an interdisciplinary survey course that brings together physics, earth sciences, history, music, and folklore, as we dive back in time to age of sail. This course will give you a broader perspective of history and the world we live it and make you a better sailor to boot.

    Topics include:

    • A brief survey of historical water craft: What determines how fast they go? How will they do in a storm?

    • Why did sails become triangular?

    • Looking to the charts: An overview of nautical navigation

    • Reading the water — Navigating without chart or map

    • Dog Watch: Song, craft and story

    • Applied use of the simple machines of physics: Lever, Wheel & Axil, Pulley, Inclined Plane, Wedge, Screw, plus a few useful knots

    • Here there be monsters — Creatures of the Sea

    Students will be asked to complete short assignments to familiarize themselves with the material and ensure that they are able to explore any questions that arise. In addition, each student will be asked to propose a project which can be shared with the class in a short presentation. The topic and form of this presentation very much depend on your interests and inclination: Will it be a video about scrimshaw, charting a course to the Bahamas, or your take on a Shanty?


    About the Instructor:

    Skia Laurence holds a Masters in Archeaology, with a specialty in Vikings, from U.C.L.A. She was a Fullbright Scholar in Iceland and went on the work at the Arbaejarsafn Living History Museum in Reykjavik. Her father was a Navy Captain and she grew up around boats. She started to drive a powerboat at the age of 8 and learned to sail small craft solo as a teen. She took sailing lessons and began sailing larger vessels during the 1980s at the MIT sailing club. She has sailed extensively on her father’s 33 foot shallow draft wing-keel, mostly in the waters of North Carolina, visiting the places Blackbeard saw, and along the inland waterway between North carolina and Florida. She also served as a crew member and docent on the Spanish reproduction Tall Ship, El Galeon. She has taken courses in boat safety, tides and currents and modern navigation techniques from the Coast Guard Auxiliary and the Power Squad and studied historical navigation, sailing instruction, first aid and water rescue at Mystic Sea Port. For several years, Skia volunteered at the Mystic Sea Port Museum, both in the music program and in the sailing instruction program.

    • 02 Feb 2021
    • (EST)
    • 18 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • 10
    Registration is closed

    InstructorSkia Laurence
    5-10 students
    Suggested Ages: 13+ years old
    Meets: Tuesdays at 2:00 pm, 15 weeks. Starts February 2nd.

    CLASS DESCRIPTION:

    Calling lovers of all things nautical. Come, gain some real understanding of the high seas. This is an interdisciplinary survey course that brings together physics, earth sciences, history, music, and folklore, as we dive back in time to age of sail. This course will give you a broader perspective of history and the world we live it and make you a better sailor to boot.

    Topics include:

    • A brief survey of historical water craft: What determines how fast they go? How will they do in a storm?

    • Why did sails become triangular?

    • Looking to the charts: An overview of nautical navigation

    • Reading the water — Navigating without chart or map

    • Dog Watch: Song, craft and story

    • Applied use of the simple machines of physics: Lever, Wheel & Axil, Pulley, Inclined Plane, Wedge, Screw, plus a few useful knots

    • Here there be monsters — Creatures of the Sea

    Students will be asked to complete short assignments to familiarize themselves with the material and ensure that they are able to explore any questions that arise. In addition, each student will be asked to propose a project which can be shared with the class in a short presentation. The topic and form of this presentation very much depend on your interests and inclination: Will it be a video about scrimshaw, charting a course to the Bahamas, or your take on a Shanty?


    About the Instructor:

    Skia Laurence holds a Masters in Archeaology, with a specialty in Vikings, from U.C.L.A. She was a Fullbright Scholar in Iceland and went on the work at the Arbaejarsafn Living History Museum in Reykjavik. Her father was a Navy Captain and she grew up around boats. She started to drive a powerboat at the age of 8 and learned to sail small craft solo as a teen. She took sailing lessons and began sailing larger vessels during the 1980s at the MIT sailing club. She has sailed extensively on her father’s 33 foot shallow draft wing-keel, mostly in the waters of North Carolina, visiting the places Blackbeard saw, and along the inland waterway between North carolina and Florida. She also served as a crew member and docent on the Spanish reproduction Tall Ship, El Galeon. She has taken courses in boat safety, tides and currents and modern navigation techniques from the Coast Guard Auxiliary and the Power Squad and studied historical navigation, sailing instruction, first aid and water rescue at Mystic Sea Port. For several years, Skia volunteered at the Mystic Sea Port Museum, both in the music program and in the sailing instruction program.

    • 04 Feb 2021
    • (EST)
    • 20 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • 10
    Registration is closed

    InstructorSkia Laurence
    5-10 students
    Suggested Ages: 13+ years old
    Meets: Thursdays at 11:00 am, 15 weeks. Starts Feb 4th.

    CLASS DESCRIPTION:

    Here’s the place to explore ways to express the things that are hard to express or that are in danger of going unnoticed.  Poetry is a healing art.  For the writer, putting things on paper — just so — can help bring clarity.  Having them written down holds those ideas and memories safe and can help release us from the need to play them again and again in our head.  Song lyrics are poetry too:  When you really want people to listen, nothing is better than to set your words to music.

    You are invited to grab a brand new journal and join us for an exploration of English language poetic forms.  We will also indulge in a few digressions into topics like why some of those forms don’t work in other languages, what forms exist in other languages that might be hard to do in English, or which comes first, the tune or the lyrics?  This is a writing intensive course.  Students are encouraged to cultivate their writer’s eye and the habit of expressive writing by keeping a journal of ideas and observations that seem as though they might prove poetry worthy.  We will study various poetic forms and try our hand at them.  Students are encouraged to share their poems, but may find other poems to share, as we explore the questions:  "Does this poem strictly follow the form?" and "What works well here?"

    Students who speak English as a Second Language or who suffer from a lack of confidence in their writing for any reason are encouraged to join and will be given extra help as needed.

    Recommended text:  A Kick in the Head: An Everyday Guide to Poetic Forms by Paul B. Janeczko


    • 04 Feb 2021
    • (EST)
    • 20 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • 10

    InstructorSkia Laurence
    5-10 students
    Suggested Ages: 13+ years old

    Meets: Thursdays at 2:00 pm, 15 weeks. Starts February 4th.

    CLASS DESCRIPTION:

    Do you like to make things? 

    Are you intrigued by learning about how things work? 

    Do you wish you had a few tips and techniques to make your projects come out more the way you wish they would? 

    Would you like a hands-on course, with creative homework that doesn’t require a major investment in materials? 

    Welcome!

    This is an art survey course offering a variety of applied technical material drawing from geometry, chemistry and history, with no studying or problem sets.  If you can add, subtract, multiple and divide, you’ve got all the pre-requisites you need —- You can even use a calculator.

    This course is creative project intensive.  Projects are intended to explore concepts, rather than  create portfolio pieces, thus perfection is not required.  Assignments will include Celtic knotworks, your choice of carpentry, quilt or garden patterns, perspective drawing, rendering texture (such a fur or bark), basic pigment color theory, the anatomy of a shadow, translucence, and even a few clues about expressive drawing of faces and figures, with an option to touch on historical trends like the popular modern manga and anime styles.  We will learn about paint and ink and even make a few samples of our own. Throughout it all, we will discuss processes of decay and how to make your art last if you want it to.

    You will need a multimedia drawing pad, ruler, compass, pencil and a small set of something to apply color (water colors, colored pencils, markers, etc),  as well as small amounts of various materials that might be found in the average kitchen.

    About the Instructor:

    Skia Laurence studied art at the Museum School in Boston , Lesley College and Rivier University  She studied technical drawing as a graduate student of archaeology at U.C.L.A. and earned a master’s certificate in Children’s Book Illustration at Hollins University.  She has done technical drawing both for archaeology and for technical documentation in industry.  She taught art to young people at Purple Crayon in San Francisco and the Chelmford Center for the Arts in Massachusetts.  She has been a juried participant in several shows and a featured artist at the Carolina Artist Gallery in Morehead City, North Carolina.  She studied museum conservation and restoration at U.C.L.A. and though correspondence with Oxford University and through hands on training at the National Museum of Iceland.

    • 20 Feb 2021
    • (EST)
    • 05 Jun 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • online
    • 10
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Lis Coburn & Josh Shaine

    Ages: 13+

    Saturdays at 1:00 pm Eastern, 15 weeks, starting February 13th

    People talk about "self-care" a lot, but not everyone's clear on just what it means. Is it self-indulgence, or self-discipline? Giving yourself a bubble bath, or making informed decisions about your medical care? This course examines the many aspects of "self-care": the choices you can make to improve your own mental, emotional, social, and physical health.

    We'll cover everything from coping with stress at home to how to find mental health care that's right for you. This course will focus on the practical details of physical, emotional, and social self-care, whether that's meals, phone calls, or asking for help.

    Rough Outline

    1. Introductions

    2. Stress Response and You: Why Your Subjective Wellbeing Matters

    3. Physical Health: Sleep and Rest

    4. Physical Health: Nutrition and Hydration

    5. Physical Health: Living with the Body You Have

    6. Emotional health: Defining Health

    7. Emotional Health: Seeking Help

    8. Emotional Health: Emotional Self-Regulation (Bad Moods, Anxiety, and Stress)

    9. Emotional Health: Topic to be determined

    10. Practical Health

    11. Life Skills: Research and Phone Calls

    12. Life Skills: Building and Using Social Networks

    13. Life Skills: Setting Boundaries

    14. Choose your own adventure!

    15. What did we miss? and Wrapping up

    All topics are approximate!

    Recommended texts: To be determined

    • 25 Mar 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 13 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 8 sessions
    • Online
    • 10
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Trina Overgaard Toups
    5-10 students
    Suggested Age Ranges: 15-18
    Meets: Thursdays, 3:00 pm - 4:30 pm (90 min.) EDT; 8 weeks, starting March 25th. 

    SAT Subject Test Prep - Chemistry

    DESCRIPTION

    Prepare for the June SAT subject test in chemistry. This 8 week course is intended for both public school and homeschooled students who are finishing a year long course in chemistry. This will be a review class, designed to prepare you for the SAT subject test. It is for those who already know the subject, and wish to prove it. The SAT subject tests can be useful for college admission of homeschooled students, required by some elite colleges, and also for placement into high school advanced classes.

    A SAT review text will be assigned, so students and instructor can work together easily. I will also draw on my fifteen years tutoring high school chemistry and preparing students for the test.

    Curriculum:

    Basic testing strategies, Types of reactions

    Periodic Properties

    Types of bonds and molecular shapes

    Gases, Solids and Liquids Colligative properties

    Organic, Nuclear, Descriptive

    Acid-Base, Equilibria, Rates of Reaction

    Electrochemistry and Thermochemistry

    Lab set-ups, Wrap-up & Last Questions

    • 06 Apr 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 17 Aug 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 20 sessions
    Register

    A semi-structured relaxed time to get together, talk, play games, connect, and just be with each other, when we can't do it in person.

    Registration is by donation only; please give only if you can. Suggested donations are $5, $10. or $15 for one hour/week groups and $5, $20, and $30 for two hour per week groups. The highest amounts cover facilitator costs. Any money we get beyond paying teachers and their expenses will be donated to charities supporting vulnerable populations at this time. If you have any questions about this policy or others, please contact us at courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org.

    Meets weekly on Tuesdays at 10:30 am Eastern for one hour.

    In Puzzles, Games, Hangout, we'll do what works best for you.  We'll do puzzles, logic puzzles, word puzzles, etc.  We'll play games.  We'll follow the group lead and have a good time hanging out.

    You can use this page to register each week or register for more than one week at a time.  This is a drop in class, so you may come on any week.

    Lisa Fontaine-Rainen





    • 13 Apr 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 11 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 5 sessions
    • online
    • 13
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Sabrina Weiss

    Days and Times Tuesdays, 5pm, 4 weeks, starting April 13th.

    Ages 12 through Adult

    Course Description

    What is right, and what is wrong?  These are questions that every society wrestles with every day.  Each of us makes decisions about the right thing to do, but we often don’t know why we do it. 

    This course will explore Western ethical thought through a philosophical approach using case studies that are commonly taught at the college level.  We will discuss different ways that philosophers determine what is right and wrong, and connect those to current events, policy, and historical contexts. Discussion heavy course with recommended readings from online sources like the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy


    Outline

    Why do we need ethics? 

    Read and Discuss: The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas

    Greatest Good for the Greatest Number: Utilitarianism and Consequentialism

    Duty and Rights: Deontological Ethics
    What Would Yoda Do?: Virtue Ethics

    • 19 Apr 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 09 Aug 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 17 sessions
    • online
    • 10
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Sherene Raisbeck

    Mondays, 7:00pm - 8:30pm, starting April 19th

    Hey! I'm supposed to be getting $10/hour! How come my check is for $287.46? You need HOW MUCH?!? to retire? Can I really save a million dollars?!? I found a great apartment and awesome roommates! Can I afford it? What should I know about my roommates? They seem nice and that's enough, right? Taxes? Everyone is talking about what they are doing with their refund, how do I get mine? What do you mean my account is overdrawn? I still have checks! 

    These topics and many more will be covered as we touch on all the ways money affects the lives of responsible (and irresponsible) adults. We will talk about earning, saving, spending and investing $$$$. Budgets, borrowing, credit reports, taxes, retirement accounts, charitable giving, etc. Job applications to rental agreements we'll talk about the $$. We'll work with real world numbers for several different life stages and economic classes. All ages welcome, adults too! Please sign up for a class with your age range as I do have a somewhat different focus with students 14 and younger than with those closer to financial independence.

    No textbooks for this course, but there will be assigned online or shared readings and suggested books for students' free time.

    $475; GHF, SENG, MAGE, and NHAGE Members pay $460!


    • 11 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 01 Jun 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 4 sessions
    • online
    • 13
    Register

    Instructor: Sabrina Weiss

    Days and Times Tuesdays, 5pm, 4 weeks, starting May 11th.

    Ages 12 through Adult

    Course Description

    This course is an introduction to three Social Contract philosophical theories by Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.  We will use secondary sources to do an overview of each theory, compare-contrast them, and discuss how they influence how we think today.  Connections to historical, social, and political context will be included.  This course could be considered an approachable introduction to philosophy.

    Students will be expected to prepare for class and participate actively in our discussions (whether through voice or text chat).  Students will also be asked to maintain a thought journal throughout the course to aid reflection and discussion. 


    Outline

    Note: Readings should be done BEFORE the class listed so we can discuss it. 

    The Leviathan: Thomas Hobbes

    Life, Liberty, Property: John Locke

    The General Will: Jean-Jacques Rousseau

    Where do we use the Social Contract today?

    • 31 May 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 13 Sep 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 sessions
    • online
    • 10
    Register

    Instructor: Sherene Raisbeck

    Mondays, 6:00pm - 7:30pm, starting May 31st

    Hey! I'm supposed to be getting $10/hour! How come my check is for $287.46? You need HOW MUCH?!? to retire? Can I really save a million dollars?!? I found a great apartment and awesome roommates! Can I afford it? What should I know about my roommates? They seem nice and that's enough, right? Taxes? Everyone is talking about what they are doing with their refund, how do I get mine? What do you mean my account is overdrawn? I still have checks! 

    These topics and many more will be covered as we touch on all the ways money affects the lives of responsible (and irresponsible) adults. We will talk about earning, saving, spending and investing $$$$. Budgets, borrowing, credit reports, taxes, retirement accounts, charitable giving, etc. Job applications to rental agreements we'll talk about the $$. We'll work with real world numbers for several different life stages and economic classes. All ages welcome, adults too! Please sign up for a class with your age range as I do have a somewhat different focus with students 14 and younger than with those closer to financial independence.

    No textbooks for this course, but there will be assigned online or shared readings and suggested books for students' free time.

    $475; GHF, SENG, MAGE, and NHAGE Members pay $460!


    • 07 Jun 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 16 Aug 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 11 sessions
    • online
    • 10

    InstructorSherene Raisbeck
    5-10 students
    Suggested Ages: enrollment based on ability, not age
    Meets:  Mondays 1:30 pm - 2:30 pm,  Eastern Time, 10 weeks starting June 7th.

    DESCRIPTION

    We will work each week on problems from previous contests. We will discuss a variety of strategies for solving the contest problems, as well as test taking strategies to maximize your score on the AMC 8. Please note that since this is a virtual class, we will not be able to help you participate in the contest by providing a contest site. We will help you find a local opportunity to participate if you would like, and we welcome those who will be participating in either contest through their school or homeschool coop.

    Those who simply enjoy solving challenging math problems should consider this course, even if they have no desire or intent to participate in either contest. The AMC 8 contest is available to students in grades 6, 7 & 8 ONLY.

    Grade levels above are dictated by AMC for the contests, any interested and able student is welcome to participate in the club

    $325; GHF, SENG, MAGE, and NHAGE Members pay $310! Single sessions $25,  subject to availability.

    We accept charter school funds


    • 05 Aug 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 07 Aug 2021
    • (EDT)
    • 3 sessions
    • Boxboro Regency Hotel, Boxboro, MA 01719 or ONLINE
    • 150
    Register

    August 5 – 7, 2021


    Boxboro Regency Hotel and Conference Center, Boxborough, MA*


    Exploring the Theory of Positive Disintegration


    ________

    The 14th International Dabrowski Congress will be held in the town of Boxborough, Massachusetts.*

    The conference will be held at the Boxboro Regency, a comfortable venue at which you can stimulate your mind and pamper your senses.

    Theme: Using TPD in the Classroom, in Therapy, and in Research

    Keynote Speaker:

    Dr. Anna Mróz

    University of Zielona Góra



Past events

23 Apr 2021 Beyond IQ ONLINE 2021 Registration
19 Mar 2021 The Omnivore’s Dilemma
14 Mar 2021 Pi Day Celebration! - Social Time
09 Feb 2021 Abnormal Psychology
08 Feb 2021 Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration
01 Feb 2021 Introduction to Shakespeare: Hamlet and Midsummer Night's Dream
28 Jan 2021 Intro to Environmental Chemistry
28 Jan 2021 Global Short Stories
26 Jan 2021 Transhumanism
25 Jan 2021 Parody and Satire 101
25 Jan 2021 Secondary Math Tutoring
25 Jan 2021 Aristotle Leads the Way
25 Jan 2021 Mathematical Explorations: Advanced Math Problem Posing
15 Jan 2021 Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers
14 Jan 2021 The Botany of Desire
06 Oct 2020 Dungeons and Dragons RPG, 13+ Fall
02 Oct 2020 Book Club: His Majesty's Dragon
18 Sep 2020 The Botany of Desire
08 Sep 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 12+
04 Sep 2020 World History to 1400CE (or so)
03 Sep 2020 Speculative Literature: Powers Beyond the Ordinary
03 Sep 2020 Why Zebras Don’t Get Ulcers
03 Sep 2020 Introduction to the American Short Story
02 Sep 2020 Speculative Literature: Science Fiction
02 Sep 2020 Programming, Modeling Languages, Patterns, and Animation
01 Sep 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 12+
31 Aug 2020 Ron Chernow's Hamilton
31 Aug 2020 Beyond Greece and Rome: Pantheons of Gods and Goddesses from Around the World
31 Aug 2020 Intensive US History Part 1 (late elementary/middle school)
31 Aug 2020 Math Fun for Little Ones
31 Aug 2020 Philosophy with Sophie's World
28 Aug 2020 Introduction to Sociology
28 Aug 2020 Money, Money, Money
28 Aug 2020 Algebra for Elementary
28 Aug 2020 Physics with Only a Little Math
28 Aug 2020 Secondary Math Tutoring
28 Aug 2020 Newton at the Center
28 Aug 2020 Elementary Math Tutoring
27 Aug 2020 High School Chemistry for Gifted Students, Part 2
27 Aug 2020 Election Math
27 Aug 2020 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
25 Aug 2020 High School Chemistry for Gifted Students
25 Aug 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 12+
24 Aug 2020 Exploring The Toll: Power, Science, History, and the Last Enemy (Arc of Scythe Part 3)
24 Aug 2020 Exploring The Toll: Power, Science, History, and the Last Enemy (Arc of Scythe Part 3)
24 Aug 2020 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 3
18 Aug 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 12+
11 Aug 2020 Social Time - Escape Room, 12+ (Communing with Nature Day 2)
04 Aug 2020 Social Time - Escape Room, 12+ (Communing with Nature Day 1))
28 Jul 2020 Social Time - Escape Room, 12+ (Blade Runner part 2)
21 Jul 2020 Social Time - Escape Room, 12+
17 Jul 2020 Social Time - Maze Rats RPG, 13+ Summer
14 Jul 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 12+
01 Jun 2020 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 2
01 Jun 2020 Speculative Literature: Science Fiction II - Novels & Movies
27 May 2020 Lucas's half of Scythe
25 May 2020 Social Time - Dice Games - ALL AGES
25 May 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 13+
19 May 2020 Social Time - Logic games, Puzzles, Escape Rooms, 8-12
18 May 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 13+
14 May 2020 Social Time -Virtual Escape Rooms, 8-12
11 May 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 13+
07 May 2020 Social Time -Virtual Escape Rooms, 8-12
04 May 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 13+
30 Apr 2020 Social Time - Puzzle and Hidden Object Adventure Game
30 Apr 2020 Social Time - Hogwarts Escape Room, 8-12
27 Apr 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 13+
24 Apr 2020 Beyond IQ ONLINE 2020 Registration
24 Apr 2020 Beyond IQ Registration
23 Apr 2020 Social Time - Puzzle and Hidden Object Adventure Game
23 Apr 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 8-12
16 Apr 2020 Social Time - Puzzle and Hidden Object Adventure Game
16 Apr 2020 Social Time - Serious Conversations About Stuff
16 Apr 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 8-12
15 Apr 2020 Social Time - Getting Started with 3D Printing
15 Apr 2020 Social Time - D&D: Curse of Strahd
14 Apr 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 13+
10 Apr 2020 Friday Social Time - Minecraft Together, 13+
09 Apr 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 8-12
09 Apr 2020 Social Time - Puzzle and Hidden Object Adventure Game
07 Apr 2020 Social Time - Maze Rats RPG, 13+
06 Apr 2020 Social Time - Games for Thinking While Playing (8-13)
06 Apr 2020 Monday Social Time - Minecraft Together, 13+
06 Apr 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 13+
03 Apr 2020 Social Time - Minecraft Together, 13+
01 Apr 2020 Social Time - SF & F Discussion Group 13-18
19 Mar 2020 Puzzlecraft: Creating a Puzzle Hunt
13 Feb 2020 Special Topics: Current Issues
12 Feb 2020 Special Topics: Introductory Philosophy
12 Feb 2020 Food: Culture, Health, Justice
12 Feb 2020 Bodies: Image, Health, Difference
11 Feb 2020 Writing Workshop: Nonfiction Essays, Persuasive, and Research Papers
05 Feb 2020 We are all digital citizens here
05 Feb 2020 Should Cars Drive Themselves?
31 Jan 2020 Newton at the Center
31 Jan 2020 Einstein Adds a New Dimension
28 Jan 2020 Animals and Us
27 Jan 2020 Money, Money, Money
27 Jan 2020 Writing to Promote Change
27 Jan 2020 Creative Writing Labs
27 Jan 2020 Mathematical Explorations: Probability, the Improbable, and the Counterintuitive
27 Jan 2020 Aristotle Leads the Way
27 Jan 2020 Writing Bravery in The Hobbit
24 Jan 2020 Social Psychology
23 Jan 2020 High School Chemistry for Gifted Students
23 Jan 2020 Exploring Scythe: Power, Science, History, and the Last Enemy
23 Jan 2020 The World of Benjamin Franklin
23 Jan 2020 Puzzle Masters
22 Jan 2020 Animals in Alice in Wonderland
21 Jan 2020 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
21 Jan 2020 Proving the Point: A Perigon of Geometry
05 Sep 2019 Nonhuman Animals and Us
04 Sep 2019 Food: Culture, Health, Justice
27 Aug 2019 Exploring Intermediate Algebra
27 Aug 2019 Science, Philosophy, and Rationality: Bringing Light to His Dark Materials - PART 3 - The Amber Spyglass
26 Aug 2019 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 3
26 Aug 2019 Special Topics in Mathematics: Patterns and Algebra
17 Jun 2019 Science, Philosophy, and Rationality: Bringing Light to His Dark Materials - PART 2 - The Subtle Knife
17 Jun 2019 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 2
25 Mar 2019 Payment Plan 4
11 Mar 2019 Payment Plan 3
18 Feb 2019 Payment Plan 2
03 Feb 2019 Historical Geology
01 Feb 2019 How to Win (More Often) at Chess
01 Feb 2019 Project Planning: From Initial Idea to Polished Product
31 Jan 2019 Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration - Section 2
31 Jan 2019 Introduction to Chemistry
31 Jan 2019 Beyond Percy Jackson: The Greek (and Roman) Myths That Inspired the Novels
31 Jan 2019 Changing Life: Extinction, Evolution, Conservation
30 Jan 2019 The Hero’s Journey for Teens: Finding Your Mythic Story
30 Jan 2019 Science, Philosophy, and Rationality: Bringing Light to His Dark Materials
30 Jan 2019 Science: a Way of Knowing
30 Jan 2019 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
30 Jan 2019 Sketchbook Adventures
30 Jan 2019 How to Research like a Professor
29 Jan 2019 Chemistry II
29 Jan 2019 Writing to Promote Change
29 Jan 2019 Puzzlecraft: Creating a Puzzle Hunt
29 Jan 2019 Character Creation Lab
29 Jan 2019 Mathematical Explorations: Geometry I - Section 2
29 Jan 2019 Payment Plan 1
28 Jan 2019 Speculative Literature: Fantasy
28 Jan 2019 Money, Money, Money
28 Jan 2019 Talking Back to Stastistics
28 Jan 2019 Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration
28 Jan 2019 Mathematical Explorations: Geometry I
28 Jan 2019 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 2
06 Nov 2018 Election Day Math - 1 Hour session
06 Nov 2018 Election Day Math
06 Nov 2018 Election Day Math - 1/2 Section Registration
29 Aug 2018 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 3
27 Aug 2018 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
01 Jun 2018 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 3
27 Apr 2018 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 2
14 Apr 2018 Girls Do Math - April Fools us with Logic!
03 Apr 2018 Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration - Spring Evening
03 Apr 2018 Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration - Spring Day
08 Mar 2018 Girls Do Math - March, Pi Day Challenges all month long!
26 Jan 2018 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
24 Jan 2018 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 2
16 Jan 2018 Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration
16 Jan 2018 Parody and Satire 101a
30 Oct 2017 Curriculum Modification for Gifted Children
16 Oct 2017 Current Events
08 Sep 2017 Parody and Satire 102
06 Sep 2017 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
14 Aug 2017 Giftedness and Underachievement
10 Jul 2017 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
10 Jul 2017 Parody and Satire 101
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