Beyond IQ

Events

Upcoming events

    • 21 Jan 2020
    • 07 May 2020
    • 31 sessions
    • 2
    Register

    Proving the Point: A Perigon of Geometry

    Tuesdays at 3:00 pm and Thursdays at 4:30 pm Eastern for 16 weeks

    Instructor: Lisa Fontaine-Rainen

    What happens when you make that point?  What if you draw this line in the sand?  Geometry may sound a lot like arguing, but the deductive logic behind it makes those arguments, well, pointless.

    Proving the Point: A Perigon of Geometry is an advanced, fast-paced high-school level geometry course that encourages deep understanding of geometric concepts, with an emphasis on Euclidean geometry, and deductive reasoning to construct proofs.  We will be working on completing a full Geometry curriculum in 16 weeks.

    The course is designed to meet the needs of gifted and twice exceptional students ready to tackle high school geometry.  In response to the needs of these students, the course is designed to be flexible and responsive – thinking, learning, and engagement take precedence over all else.  With this in mind, the syllabus may change based on the needs of the students.

    This course will weave Geometry: Seeing, Doing, Understanding by Harold Jacobs with Art of Problem Solving’s Introduction to Geometry.  Students are encouraged to have access to both texts – please contact the instructor directly if this is a financial hardship.

    Students will need to do homework outside of class to ensure we can keep up the pace.  This will include in-depth problems, simple exercises, proofs, quizzes and tests, and projects.  Work will be modified based on the learning needs of each student, and opportunities for further exploration will usually be provided.  Grades are optional – learning is constant.

    Syllabus:

    Week 1: Introduction to Geometry

    Week 2: Introduction to Deductive Reasoning

    Week 3: Lines and Angles – an introduction to construction

    Week 4: Congruence – Triangles and Constructions

    Week 5: Inequalities in Geometry

    Week 6: Parallel Lines and Proofs

    Week 7: Quadrilaterals

    Week 8: Transformations

    Week 9: Area

    Week 10: Similarity

    Week 11: The Right Triangle – an introduction to Trigonometry

    Week 12: Circles

    Week 13: Concurrence Theorems

    Week 14: Regular Polygons

    Week 15: Geometric Solids

    Week 16: Non-Euclidean Geometries

    • 23 Jan 2020
    • 07 May 2020
    • 15 sessions
    • On Line
    • 10
    Registration is closed

    Lisa Fontaine-Rainen, instructor

    Is a world without death an ideal to be dreamed of?  What if we can also ensure that everyone has enough to live?  Will it lead to a rise of art and human expression?  Will it mean we learn to be kind and build relationships to last?

    And what if there’s a limit to how many humans it can support?

    In Scythe we follow the story of two young apprentices, being taught the methods and intense ethics of being one of those who decides who will die, to ensure the world can continue to support humanity. 

    While the premise may sound grim, the thinking they must engage in is profoundly moving.  The book affords us an opportunity to examine examples of power throughout history, the history of science, how scientific development has changed the human experience, and the role of technology and artificial intelligence in humanity’s future.  We’ll explore the relationship between the human experience and human expression, philosophy and ethics, and numerous literary and historical references. 

    Participants will engage in discussions about specific chapters each class, and we will develop answers to overall questions throughout the course.  In addition to the reading, there will be small homework assignments intended to provoke thought and response – written responses are not required.  There will be a few larger assignments that may involve some research and analysis, and some creative expression.  These can be tailored to individual needs.

    The following syllabus breaks down the chapters read for each week.  It will be revised to include topics and questions we’ll explore each week, and titles for each day.

    No class April 9th.

    Syllabus:

    Day 1: Introduction to the course and main themes. 

    Reading: Chapters 1 and 2 (to be completed before the first class)

    Day 2:

    Reading: Chapters 3, 4, 5

    Day 3:

    Chapters 6, 7, 8

    Day 4:

    Chapters 9, 10, 11

    Day 5:

    Chapters 12, 13, 14

    Day 6:

    Chapters 15, 16, 17

    Day 7:

    Chapters 18, 19, 20, 21

    Day 8:

    Chapters 22, 23

    Day 9:

    Chapters 24, 25, 26

    Day 10:

    Chapters 27, 28, 29*  (29 may be moved to day 11)

    Day 11: 

    Chapters 30, 31, 32, 33

    Day 12:

    Chapters 34, 35, 36

    Day 13:

    Chapters 37, 38

    Day 14:

    Chapters 39, 40

    Day 15: 

    Examining story as a whole, discussing screen adaptations, final assignment work, looking forward.

    Current assignments planned (these may be modified, some may be optional):

    Research assignment: Power and corruption

    Names and Scythes – a historical comparison

    Self as a Scythe – a self-reflection

    Study of an Artist’s Life

    Creative writing assignment – imagining possible futures



    • 23 Jan 2020
    • 14 May 2020
    • 17 sessions
    • Online
    • 7
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Trina Overgaard Toups
    5-10 students
    Suggested Age Ranges: 12-17
    Meets: Thursdays, 4:00 pm - 5:30 pm Eastern Time

    DESCRIPTION

    High School Chemistry for Gifted Homeschoolers

    Is your student ready for a systematic study of science? Going beyond the wow factor of videos and games, we will embark on a tour of general chemistry appropriate for honors chemistry high school students. The complete course will be two full semesters. 


    StudentsIt is expected that the students for this will approximately fit the following profile:

    1. Gifted Students in the age range 12-17.

    2. Eager and excited to learn about science, and discuss it with peers.

    3. Comfortable with math, and probably have completed Algebra I.

    4. Able to commit to out of class work in the neighborhood of up to 3-4 hours per week.

    5. Willing to be guided to learn rather than led through all details.

    6. Able to respect the pace of the classroom setting, which will move quickly, and limit participation to on-topic matters.

    7. Realize that chemistry builds upon prior knowledge, and try to stay current with the material.

    MaterialsFamilies will be requested to provide a calculator, pencil, and paper every session. Textbook will be an online text for $75 which also includes interactive modules for learning. Cost covers 720 days of usage. Source: https://digital.wwnorton.com/chem5SAT supplemental materials will be workbooks which can be purchased for moderate costs.


    CurriculumThe curriculum will consist of a full year course such as would be offered as honors chemistry, or perhaps AP chemistry in high schools. Students will be expected and encouraged to continue learning each section through further course materials and assignments provided by the instructor. Assignments will not have undue repetition or drudgery, but should be taken seriously by the student and family for effective learning.  Documentation of material covered and certification of participation will be provided for students who wish to use such to attain credit from institutions. Students and parents who wish this option should be diligent in keeping records of student work. 



    • 24 Jan 2020
    • 17 Apr 2020
    • 13 sessions
    • online
    • 10
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Josh Shaine

    Fridays at 4:30 pm Eastern, 12 weeks, starting January 24


    This study is an introduction to why we do what we do ­ or at least, a lot of different people's views of it! We'll look at some of the popular theorists, a few of the unpopular ones, one or two of the obscure ones, and at least one of the totally impossible (for me, at least) to understand ones!

    Emphasis will be on how it applies to life today, for you and other people. Theorists will include Freud, Jung, Skinner, Dabrowski, Wilbur, Gilligan, and many more.

    Homework will include lots of reading, some video­watching, and two or three papers.

    Outline to follow.

    1. Introductions and Definitions
    2. Correlation and Causation
    3. Social Cognition, Schemas and Heuristics
    4. Self-fulfilling Prophecies
    5. Bases of Self-worth
    6. End of Term Project 
    7. Self-awareness, Self-perception, and Other Selfish Concepts
    8. Advertising, Persuasion, and Attitude Change
    9. Persuasion and Conformity
    10. Unitary vs. Divisive Tasks
    11. Helping Behavior in Emergencies
    12. Final Project Presentations
    • 27 Jan 2020
    • 18 May 2020
    • 17 sessions
    • online
    • 8
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Sherene Raisbeck

    Dates and Times to be set soon

    Aristotle Leads the Way is the first of three works by Joy Hakim that present the major scientific innovations within the context of work performed by Aristotle, Newton, Einstein, and work which continues in theoretical physics.

    Learning how to observe the world, investigate ideas and sources, and find out what’s really true, are important skills for new scholars! Students develop a rich understanding of the science presented by tracing the historical context and experiments of the greatest thinkers in Western as well as Eastern scientific thought.

    As the first part of The Story of Science series, this class is an excellent foundation for further advanced work in science, mathematics, and computer science. It lays a foundation for Newton at the Center and Einstein Adds a New Dimension. In addition, the story-based instruction utilized will enhance retention for students who are not scientifically oriented. Over the course of the term, we will measure the circumference of the earth, the distance to the moon, and lay the foundations for atomic theory!

    Tests, homework, and grades are provided optionally and may be graded at home or by the instructor. We fully support 2e students and will tailor testing, homework, and class participation so that it is low stress and meaningful for each student. Students do need to be able to do simple multiplication with ratios.

    While some experiments are repeated from the Einstein and Newton courses, students will encounter them on a different level. These courses do NOT need to be taken in a particular order.

    Find the Aristotle Leads the Way book here.

    Please note that this is a one semester course


    • 27 Jan 2020
    • 11 May 2020
    • 16 sessions
    • Online
    • 3
    Registration is closed

    CLASS DESCRIPTION:

    Mathematical Explorations: Probability, the Improbable and the Counterintuitive

    Mathematics courses often teach students how to solve problems, use algorithms, and number crunch.  Even probability classes tend to focus on algoriths for solving problems in probability, rather than exploring how far one can go, and how counterintuitive some of the answers may be.

    Our Special Topics and Mathematical Explorations courses teach students how to pose problems, develop algorithms, explore ideas, prove (both formally and informally) their methods and ideas work, and propose next steps.  Students can use the skills learned in these classes to stretch their regular math curriculum, challenge their assumptions about mathematics, and truly think like a mathematician.

    In Probability, the Improbable and the Counterintuitive, we’ll delve deeply into some astonishing ideas in probability.  We’ll look at some counterintuitive problems, discussing what makes them counterintuitive and how to make them clear.  We’ll pose all sorts of problems that will make us think much deeper than any basic probability problem.  We’ll delve deeply into Bayesian probability, game theory, the math behind card counting and the MIT teams that took Vegas for millions, and so much more.

    SYLLABUS

    Week 1: Introduction to Problem Posing in Probability - coin flipping part 1

    Week 2: Coin flipping part 2 - counterintuitive results

    Week 3: Guessing numbers - strategies and extensions

    Week 4: Using the complement - the Birthday Problem

    Week 5: Monty Hall problem with extensions

    Week 6: Ellsberg Paradox and other classical counterintuitive probability problems

    Week 7: Introduction to expected value with some game analysis

    Week 8: Card counting, MIT blackjack teams, strategy and expected value

    Week 9: Game Theory Introduction, classical problems

    Week 10: Bayesian Probability

    Week 11: Plane problem, hat problem

    Week 12: Probability and combinatorics – extended problem solving

    Week 13: Game analysis

    Week 14: A flexible day to catch up on anything we’ve missed or would like to extend:

    Week 15: Student posed problems

    (Term is 16 weeks; one of those weeks is a Fall Break)


    • 27 Jan 2020
    • 18 May 2020
    • 17 sessions
    • Online
    Registration is closed

    Speculative Literature: Powers Beyond the Ordinary - "Super" Women and Men in Science Fiction & Fantasy

    InstructorJosh Shaine
    3-10 students
    Suggested Ages: 13+ years old
    Meets: Mondays, 4:30 pm ET, 15 sessions starting January 27th

    CLASS DESCRIPTION:

    Science Fiction and Fantasy stories have many characters who stick out compared to others because they have more magic, different powers, unique abilities.  Are they hidden or revealed? Are they accepted, worshipped or reviled? How much difference does there have to be for a person to get noticed? We will look at how these characters are treated by the worlds in which they are set and reflect on what, if anything, this says about the society in which we live. We'll look at settings such as Star Wars, Harry Potter, and the X-Men, as well as many other works - well known and uncommon, both. During the final two sessions, students will have a chance to present their own stories about one of the characters and worlds we discussed or their own creation.


    PrerequisitesNone

    SYLLABUS:

    Speculative Literature:
    Powers Beyond the Ordinary – “Super” Women & Men in Science Fiction & Fantasy

    • 1.       Introduction: Mutants, Wizards, & Geniuses
    • 2.       The Uncanny X-Men
    • 3.       Harry, Hermione, and the Potterverse
    • 4.       Diane Duane’s Young Wizards
    • 5.       Luke, Yoda, Anakin, and Rey
    • 6.       Stephanie Tolan’s Welcome to the Ark
    • 7.       Designing Meta-humans: How much power is too much?
    • 8.       Tamora Pierce’s Circle of Magic
    • 9.       Superman vs. Batman: What makes a superhero?
    • 10.   Sherlock Holmes
    • 11.   Ideas from Class Discussion
    • 12.   John Hersey’s The Child Buyer
    • 13.   Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game
    • 14.   Comparison and Contrast
    • 15.   Class Presentations
    • 16.   Make-up Day


    • 27 Jan 2020
    • 18 May 2020
    • 17 sessions
    • online
    • 8
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Sherene Raisbeck

    Mondays, 5:00pm - 6:00pm, starting January 27th

    Hey! I'm supposed to be getting $10/hour! How come my check is for $287.46? You need HOW MUCH?!? to retire? Can I really save a million dollars?!? I found a great apartment and awesome roommates! Can I afford it? What should I know about my roommates? They seem nice and that's enough, right? Taxes? Everyone is talking about what they are doing with their refund, how do I get mine? What do you mean my account is overdrawn? I still have checks! 

    These topics and many more will be covered as we touch on all the ways money affects the lives of responsible (and irresponsible) adults. We will talk about earning, saving, spending and investing $$$$. Budgets, borrowing, credit reports, taxes, retirement accounts, charitable giving, etc. Job applications to rental agreements we'll talk about the $$. We'll work with real world numbers for several different life stages and economic classes. All ages welcome, adults too! Please sign up for a class with your age range as I do have a somewhat different focus with students 14 and younger than with those closer to financial independence.

    No textbooks for this course, but there will be assigned online or shared readings and suggested books for students' free time.


    • 28 Jan 2020
    • 14 Apr 2020
    • 12 sessions
    • online
    • 7
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Sabrina Weiss

    Tuesdays, 12:00 pm Eastern, January 28th - April 14th 


    Animals are a part of us.  We are animals. We live with animals, we tell stories about animals, we sometimes kill and eat animals. They are a part of our history, our myths, our present, and our future.  We would not be able to exist without other animals, and some of them would not be able to exist without us. But some animals are also in danger because of us.


    How can we better understand and appreciate animals?  This course will explore the many types of relationships we have with our cousins and discuss what we can do to connect and respect them.  Students will be guided in creating, developing, and presenting a final project on a topic related to the course.


    Topic sections: 


    Part 1: Everyday Animals

    Part 2: Mythological and Fantastical Animals

    Part 3: Animals as People?

    • 31 Jan 2020
    • 22 May 2020
    • 17 sessions
    • online
    • 10

    Instructor: Sherene Raisbeck

    Fridays, 10:00am - 11:30am; starting January 31st

    Einstein Adds a New Dimension is the third of three works in Joy Hakim's Story of Sciencethat present the major scientific innovations within the context of major works produced by Aristotle, Newton, Einstein, and progress which continues in theoretical physics.

    Learning how to make accurate and useful observations, investigate ideas, evaluate sources, and find out what’s really true, are important skills for scholars in all fields of endeavor.

    Students in Einstein Adds a New Dimension continue to develop their understanding of the historical context and great experiments of the world’s innovators.

    As the third part of The Story of Science series, Einstein Adds a New Dimension builds on the foundation set forward in the courses Aristotle Leads the Way and Newton at the Center.  Einstein Adds a New Dimension guides students through discoveries in modern physics, explaining the state of the science, while describing some of the current questions and areas of research.  Building on the themes in courses Aristotle and NewtonEinstein Adds a New Dimension helps students strengthen their solid basis of understanding, understand the nature and pace of change, and develop the insight, imagination, and skill to anticipate, jump in, and move forward with the new work of the future.

    Over the course of the year, we will explore the lines of evidence for the current theory of the universe; we will discover the nature of quarks and strings; and we will discuss alternative hypotheses and theories.  We will continue building the scaffold for later studies in science and other endeavors, and developing skills which will be used in career planning and development.

    This course will be using additional material from Thinking Physics by Lewis Carroll Epstein, but students are not required to have this book.

    Tests, homework, and grades are provided optionally and may be graded at home or by the instructor.  We fully support 2e students and will tailor testing, homework, and class participation so that it is low stress and meaningful for each student.  Students need to be able to do multiplication with fractions and ratios, and to understand the use of algebraic symbols.

    While some experiments are repeated from the Newton and Aristotle courses, students will encounter them on a different level. These courses do NOT need to be taken in a particular order.

    Find the Einstein Adds a New Dimension book here.

    Times listed are Eastern! 


    • 31 Jan 2020
    • 22 May 2020
    • 17 sessions
    • online
    • 9
    Registration is closed

    InstructorSherene Raisbeck
    5-10 students
    Suggested Ages: 8-12
    Meets: 11:45am - 1:15pm,  Eastern Time

    NOTE: In the past, this course has been offered over two terms. We plan to offer it as a single term course with sessions running 75-90 minutes. We believe this better meets the needs of our gifted students.

    DESCRIPTION

    Newton at the Center is the second of three works by Joy Hakim that present the major scientific innovations within the context of major works produced by Aristotle, Newton, Einstein, and progress which continues in theoretical physics.

    Learning how to make accurate and useful observations, investigate ideas, evaluate sources, and find out what’s really true, are important skills for scholars in all fields of endeavor.

    Students in Newton at the Center continue to develop their understanding of the historical context and great experiments of the world’s innovators.

    As the second part of The Story of Science series, Newton at the Center builds on the foundation set forward in the course Aristotle Leads the Way and prepares the student for Einstein Adds a New Dimension (although the courses can be taken in any order). From the Copernican Revolution to the Renaissance to the Curies, from the discovery of the planetary system to radiation, Newton at the Center brings students through major discoveries in classical science, integrating the major themes of scientific analysis, evidence, and reasoning with the framework of history and the humanities to establish a solid scaffold for later studies. 

    Over the course of the term, we will weigh the earth, discover the invisible, and we will explore the tiny scale of the atom and the vastness of the universe. We will build the scaffold for later studies in science and other endeavors.

    Tests, homework, and grades are provided optionally and may be graded at home or by the instructor. We fully support 2e students and will tailor testing, homework, and class participation so that it is low stress and meaningful for each student. Students need to be able to do simple multiplication with fractions and ratios.

    This is a 1 semester course!  While some experiments are repeated from the Einstein and Aristotle courses, students will encounter them on a different level. These courses do NOT need to be taken in a particular order.

    Find the Newton at the Center book here.

    Please note that this is a one semester course. 

    SYLLABUS

    Spring semester

    1.      Off-Center? It Can’t Be!
    2.      A New Age: Bringing New Ways of Seeing
    3.      On Revolutions and Fools
    4.      Tycho Brahe: Taking Heaven’s Measure
    5.      Renaissance Men
    6.      Gazing at a Star Named Galileo
    7.      Moving Relatively or Relatively Moving?
    8.      Are Novas Really “New”Stars? As to Supernovas – Wow!
    9.      Moving the Sun and the Earth
    10.  Do You Think You Have Troubles?
    11.  Poor Kepler
    12.  Descartes and His Coordinates
    13.  What’s the Big Attraction?
    14.  Gravity – How Absurd!
    15.  Newton Sees the Light
    16.  Newton Moves
    17.  Fame Finds Newton
    18.  A Dane Lights the Way
    19.  What’s the Matter? (About Elements and Alchemy)
    20.  Robert Boyle, Skeptic – or Airhead?
    21.  Daniel and the Old Lion Hunter
    22.  Brains and Beauty Squared
    23.  It’s a Gas! Take Its Temperature!
    24.  Weighing the World
    25.  The Right Man for the Job
    26.  A Man with a Powerful Head
    27.  Dalton Takes Us Back to Greece – and Atoms
    28.  A Molecule-and-Number Man
    29.  Putting Things in Order
    30.  The Heated Story of an American Spy
    31.  A Shocking Science
    32.  Michael Faraday Has a Field Day
    33.  Maxwell’s Changes
    34.  Building Boltzmann
    35.  Wake Up!  This Is About Work, Which Takes Energy
    36.  A Number-One Law, Thermodynamically Speaking
    37.  Obeying the (Second) Law
    38.  Tying Down a Demon
    39.  Nothing to Do?
    40. 
    Wrapping up and Getting Ready

     

    $300; GHF, SENG, MAGE, and NHAGE Members pay $280!

    We accept charter school funds


    • 11 Feb 2020
    • 28 Apr 2020
    • 12 sessions
    • online
    • 15
    Register

    Instructor: Sabrina Weiss

    Tuesdays at 4:00 pm Eastern

    Section 1: Starting February 11th

    Section 2: Starting March 10th

    Section 3: Starting April 7th

    Register individually for each section or for all at once.

    Description:  

    This is a workshop-style class for students who are writing or who have already written nonfiction papers like essays and research papers, to get help revising and editing them.  We will identify student needs and provide feedback, support, and suggestions on how to progress with their papers. We will encourage the use of goals and objectives to help organize and plan writing and editing.  Students will be expected to initiate any research that is needed and do the writing. Students will also be expected to offer constructive feedback and criticism to other students as part of the workshop format.  


    This workshop will be available for taking multiple times over the term.  




    • 12 Feb 2020
    • 06 May 2020
    • 12 sessions
    • online
    • 15
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Sabrina Weiss

    Wednesdays at 12:00 pm Eastern, 12 weeks, starting February 12th

    No classes on April 8th.

    Description: 

    Bodies are strange.  They grow, they change, they do funny things.  We are judged on how our bodies look. Our bodies let us do things in the world.  


    Mature Material: Students taking this course must feel comfortable discussing basic bodily functions, looking at images of bodies, and respect sharing by other students about relevant personal experiences.  Sexuality, basic knowledge of sexual reproduction, and gender norms will be discussed in a mature, appropriate, and inclusive way. 


    Topic Sections: 


    Part 1:  Body Images - Starts February 12

    How do we learn what bodies look like? 

    What is “normal”?  What is “abnormal”?  Why does this matter? 

    How can ideas about “normal bodies” hurt people? 

    How can we change our assumptions about “normal bodies”? 


    Part 2: Un/Healthy Bodies - Starts March 11

    How do we measure whether a body is healthy or unhealthy? 

    What are factors that contribute to health or un-health? 


    Part 3: Different Bodies - Starts April 8

    Disability and difference

    What is a “dis-ability”? 





    • 12 Feb 2020
    • 06 May 2020
    • 12 sessions
    • online
    • 15
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Sabrina Weiss

    Wednesdays at 2:00 pm Eastern, 12 weeks, starting February 12th


    Food is a universal human experience: everybody eats. Food is a way for us to connect across generations, locations, and societies. But every culture and community prepares, serves, and values food in different ways.  By studying and discussing food, we can understand much about people, their values, and their traditions.  

    This course will explore food as a human experience, as tradition, as healthy/unhealthy, as a way that societies promote or undermine justice.  We will connect food to personal values, historical events, ethics about animals and the environment, and laws and policies. This will be a “college-style,” discussion-focused course.  Students will be expected to read a book about food during the term and do a project related to the course topic by the end of the course. 


    No classes on April 8th.


    Topic sections: 

    Part 1: Culture of Food

    Part 2: Un/Healthy Food?

    Part 3: Ethics and Justice of Food

    • 12 Feb 2020
    • 06 May 2020
    • 13 sessions
    • online
    • 14
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Sabrina Weiss

    Wednesdays, 4pm, starting February 12th, 12 sessions.

    Students may register for individual parts or the entire class.

    No class April 8th.

    Course Description

    These three mini-courses offer a quick overview of some introductory philosophical concepts that are relevant to our lives in society today.

    Part 1: Ethical Philosophy Introduction - Starts February 12

    What is right, and what is wrong?  These are questions that every society wrestles with every day.  Each of us makes decisions about the right thing to do, but we often don’t know why we do it. 

    This course will explore Western ethical thought through a philosophical approach using case studies that are commonly taught at the college level.  We will discuss different ways that philosophers determine what is right and wrong, and connect those to current events, policy, and historical contexts. Discussion heavy course with recommended readings from online sources like the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy


    Sample Topics:


    What is Ethics? What is Philosophy? 

    Real world examples showing why ethics is needed 

    Utilitarian Ethics, Part 1: Trolley problem 

    Utilitarian Ethics, Part 2: Lifeboat 

    Deontological Ethics, Part 1: Transplant 

    Deontological Ethics, Part 2: Revisiting the Trolley and Lifeboat 

    Virtue Ethics 

    Care Ethics



    Part 2:   Social Contract Theory: How did we stop stabbing each other? - Starts March 13

    This course is an introduction to three Social Contract philosophical theories by Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau.  We will use secondary sources to do an overview of each theory, compare-contrast them, and discuss how they influence how we think today.  Connections to historical, social, and political context will be included. This course could be considered an approachable introduction to philosophy.

    Students will be expected to prepare for class and participate actively in our discussions (whether through voice or text chat).  Students will also be asked to maintain a thought journal throughout the course to aid reflection and discussion. 


    Part 3: Public and Private: Understanding Government, Corporations, and Everything In-Between - Starts April 8th 

    This course will explore the concepts of “public” and “private” in society and politics, with a focus on the United States, but comparing/contrasting to international examples.  We will begin with a current events brainstorm about ways that “public” and “private” are used in current discourse, along with expectations and moral implications. Then we will explore the history of the concepts of “public”  and “private”, starting with the Ancient Greeks and moving through the European origins of the corporation. Then we will return to the present day to critically examine how assumptions based in old history influence us today. Finally, we will explore some case studies that show that we need to come up with new ways of discussing public and private. 



    Topics: 


    • Issue Brainstorm: why do “public” and “private” matter?  (e.g. parenthood, property, privacy, land)

    • Polis and Oikos: Public and Private in Ancient Greece (e.g. citizenship, gender, discourse)

    • Corporations are People Too!: the rise of the corporation as a public and private entity

    • The present and future of public/private

    • 13 Feb 2020
    • 30 Apr 2020
    • 12 sessions
    • online
    • 15
    Registration is closed

    Instructor: Sabrina Weiss

    Thursdays, 12pm, 12 weeks, starting February 13

    Students may register for individual parts or the entire class.

    Course Description

    These mini-courses offer a quick overview of three current topics connected to science, technology, and values that are relevant to us today. 

    Part 1:  Should Cars Drive Themselves? - Starts February 13

    Should we give control of our cars to computers?  What are the pros and cons of this?

    With the status quo showing that humans are bad at driving cars because we easily get distracted and don’t make rational judgements under pressure, are we fooling ourselves into thinking that humans are safer than we actually are? 

    This course will be a short, intensive exploration of self-driving cars and the issues surrounding them today.  We will practice critical thinking, question framing, and analysis based on research. Students will be expected to do independent research to prepare for class discussions.   

    Texts

    “All Hail the Driverless Car!” - IQ2 US Debate

    Outline

    Introduction to topic

    Watch and discuss “All Hail the Driverless Car!” (2 weeks)

    Background research: status quo driving statistics

    Background research: history of self-driving cars and algorithms

    Analysis and Discussion: putting these together


    Part 2: Who Killed the Climate?: Investigation and Inquiry - Starts March 12

    This topic-specific course will do a deep dive on the topic of climate change.  We will frame this like a murder mystery “whodunnit”: starting with current projections about climate change and the disasters that we see, we will work backwards using living history methods to reconstruct the series of events and decisions that led us to where we are now. This will be an immersive and engaging method for learning the history and politics of climate science, climate policy, and environmental regulations. 

    Students will be expected to prepare for each class meeting by independently investigating a focus question using resources freely available, like internet archives and searches, as well as library resources.  This will be a discussion heavy course, and students will be expected to contribute through voice or text communications during class in an interactive way with the instructor and classmates.  

    Students will choose a subtopic related to the course topic to focus on to prepare a 3 minute briefing for the final class meeting. 


    Part 3: We are All Digital Citizens - Starts April 9 

    This course is an introduction to the concept of digital citizenship, an awareness that when we interact with people in online and other digital spaces our conduct matters. While there are risks that we should be aware of, there are choices we can make to be safer and to make a positive climate for everyone. We will look at different types of digital spaces like games, social media, and discussion forums and will discuss risks and responsibilities for each. 

    Topics: 

    What is Digital Citizenship, and how are we all citizens of the online space? 

    Citizenship in games: playing well with others

    Conflict in Social Media: how to discuss issues respectfully

    Managing privacy

    • 19 Mar 2020
    • (PDT)
    • 14 May 2020
    • (PDT)
    • 8 sessions
    • Online
    • 10
    Register

    CLASS DESCRIPTION:

    Do you love Escape Rooms?  Do you wish you were at MIT each January to join the MIT Mystery Hunt? (http://www.mit.edu/~puzzle/)  Do you love to share your intense interests with others and are intrigued by the idea of crafting a puzzle from your passion?  This is the space we get to do all of that – puzzling, creating, and tying together all our passions into one incredible GHF Puzzle Hunt!

    Puzzle Hunts are made from a set of puzzles that give an answer upon being completed – usually a word or phrase.  Those answers work together in a meta-puzzle that gives a single final answer.  (Or, in more complex hunts, the meta puzzles work together towards a meta-meta puzzle.  Or… yes, it can get complex!)

    By the end of the course, students will have collaborated in making and playtesting our own Puzzle Hunt using techniques for puzzle creation that we will play without throughout the course.  We will also be solving a mini-puzzle hunt and exploring puzzles from the MIT Mystery Hunt – likely from both this year (theme dependent) and previous years.

    Syllabus is subject to change based on progress through puzzle creation and Puzzle Hunt progress.  Students are highly encouraged to explore puzzle hunts and propose changes to our syllabus based on kinds of puzzles they want to explore more deeply.

    Every day will include some collaborative puzzling and puzzle creation.  Homework assignments will be entirely doing and crafting puzzles, and will be important for making the class work.  Expect at least an hour of puzzling a week outside of class.  Students will be able to stretch that to many more if they so choose.

    For more information and example of Puzzle Hunts, look at:

                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puzzlehunt

                http://www.mit.edu/~puzzle/ - If you look in the archives, the 2006 MysteryHunt was my introduction to Puzzle Hunts and I still think it was a good hunt!  Last year’s Hunt, based on the movie Inside Out, also shares the kick-off video and has a lot of great puzzles as well.

                http://pandamagazine.com/ - there’s a sampler puzzle at the bottom that you can work on (as a family, if you like!) to give you a sense of how to do a puzzle hunt.  This is what we’ll be shooting for.  We’ll be completing an issue of this magazine together as well.

    SYLLABUS:

    Day 1: Course introduction.  Discussion and sharing of favorite puzzles.  Discussion of issues in crafting puzzles and approaches that help.  Sharing of passions, brainstorming ways to make them into puzzles.

    Day 2:  In-depth look at puzzle hunts and beginning to work on one.  Clue extraction – crafting a simple puzzle with an extractable clue. The importance of flavor text. 

    Day 3:  Introduction to cryptic clues – looking at several different puzzles that use cryptic clues.  Crafting a cryptic clue-based puzzle.

    Day 4: The role of cultural references in puzzling, and identification of references students may wish to include.

    Day 5: Metapuzzles – how they work, beginning to lay out possibilities for our own metapuzzle. 

    Day 6: Focused time for working our way through a puzzle hunt.  Gathering of ideas for our own hunt.

    Day 7: Word puzzles.  Use of language or story to create puzzles, making simple word puzzles, such as word searches, more complex.

    Day 8: Visual puzzles.  The use of images and even video in puzzle crafting.

    Day 9: Creating puzzles based on games (video or board).

    Day 10: Logic puzzles – using or creating your own logic puzzle for a puzzle hunt.

    Day 11:  Puzzlecrafting: Planning out the puzzles that will work together in our Puzzle Hunt. 

    Day 12: Puzzlecrafting part 2:  The importance of playtesting.  Checking in on progress, extra puzzle time.

    Day 13: Exploring additional puzzles based on student requests and needs.

    Day 14: Final coordination of our own puzzle hunt and the one we’re solving together.

    Day 15: Presentation of Puzzle hunt – inviting others to come puzzle with us!


    • 01 Apr 2020
    • 22 Apr 2020
    • 4 sessions
    • 4
    Register

    A semi-structured relaxed time to get together, talk about Science Fiction & Fantasy books, TV shows, or movies; connect; and just be with each other online, when we can't do it in person.

    While the sessions are set up over a four week period, folks can join us for any number of sessions.

    Registration is by donation only; please give only if you can. Suggested donations are $5, $10. or $15 for per week. The highest amounts cover facilitator costs. Any money we get beyond paying teachers and their expenses will be donated to charities supporting vulnerable populations at this time. If you have any questions about this policy or others, please contact us at courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org.


    Wednesday, April 1st, 1:00 - 2:00 pm Eastern 

    SF & F Discussion

    Josh Shaine





    • 06 Apr 2020
    • 04 May 2020
    • 5 sessions
    • 9
    Register

    A semi-structured relaxed time to get together, talk, play games, connect, and just be with each other, when we can't do it in person.

    Registration is by donation only; please give only if you can. Suggested donations are $20 per two hour/week group. (You can pay weekly or a bunch in advance.) Any money we get beyond paying teachers and their expenses will be donated to charities supporting vulnerable populations at this time. If you have any questions about this policy or others, please contact us at courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org. is by donation only.  

    Mondays, April 6, 1-3pm Eastern (2 hours)

    Minecraft

    Dr. Sabrina Weiss

    Description: We will meet up to play together on a Minecraft Realms server for 2 hours at a time.  This will be survival mode, and players are expected to either cooperate or at a minimum avoid PvP unless it is mutually agreed upon (for duels).  Because this server will only be active during set times, this is a good “social” server for playing with others (rather than a “building” server to to complex builds).   This will be a great chance to play Minecraft with others, share and learn tips and tricks, and work together to survive!

    What you need: Minecraft Bedrock/Windows 10/Pocket/XBox/Switch (not Java) and internet access to join a Realm.  

    Note: Our code of conduct will be strictly enforced!  Griefing will result in removal and banning from the server.  We are coming together to have fun in positive, constructive ways.





    • 06 Apr 2020
    • 27 Apr 2020
    • 4 sessions
    • 0
    Join waitlist

    A semi-structured relaxed time to get together and talk about and play games that are not based on luck; connect; and just be with each other, when we can't do it in person.

    While the sessions are set up over a four week period, folks can join us for any number of sessions.

    Registration is by donation only; please give only if you can. Suggested donations are $5, $10. or $15 for per week. The highest amounts cover facilitator costs. Any money we get beyond paying teachers and their expenses will be donated to charities supporting vulnerable populations at this time. If you have any questions about this policy or others, please contact us at courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org.


    Mondays, starting April 6th, 4:30 - 5:30 pm Eastern 

    Games for Playing While Thinking

    Josh Shaine





    • 09 Apr 2020
    • 4:30 PM - 5:30 PM
    • 9
    Register

    A semi-structured relaxed time to get together, talk, play games, connect, and just be with each other, when we can't do it in person.

    Registration is by donation only; please give only if you can. Suggested donations are $5, $10. or $15 for one hour/week groups and $5, $20, and $30 for two hour per week groups. The highest amounts cover facilitator costs. Any money we get beyond paying teachers and their expenses will be donated to charities supporting vulnerable populations at this time. If you have any questions about this policy or others, please contact us at courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org.

    Thursday, April 9, 4:30 pm

    We're going to venture into the world of Drawn, a Hidden Objects Puzzle Adventure game - there are hidden objects scenes, puzzle scenes, and a storyline to follow.  We'll work together to figure out what to do, take turns on mouse control, and explore together!

    Lisa Fontaine-Rainen





    • 09 Apr 2020
    • 6:15 PM - 7:15 PM
    • 6
    Register

    A semi-structured relaxed time to get together, talk, play games, connect, and just be with each other, when we can't do it in person.

    Registration is by donation only.  If you wish to donate an amount other than the options, please select $0 and contact us at courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org.


    Thursday, April 9th, 6:15 - 7:15 pm Eastern 

    Logic puzzles (part 2) 

    Exploring Logic Puzzle Games -or- Alice in Puzzleland continued (participants' choice)

    Lisa Fontaine-Rainen





    • 14 Apr 2020
    • 4:15 PM - 5:15 PM
    • 9
    Register

    A semi-structured relaxed time to get together, talk, play games, connect, and just be with each other, when we can't do it in person.

    Registration is by donation only; please give only if you can. Suggested donations are $5, $10. or $15 for one hour/week groups and $5, $20, and $30 for two hour per week groups. The highest amounts cover facilitator costs. Any money we get beyond paying teachers and their expenses will be donated to charities supporting vulnerable populations at this time. If you have any questions about this policy or others, please contact us at courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org.

    Tuesday, April 14th, 4:15 Eastern

    Logic puzzles - Part 2!  Come play more with The Lady or the Tiger, and venture into some of my favorite online puzzles.

    Lisa Fontaine-Rainen





    • 15 Apr 2020
    • 07 Oct 2020
    • 26 sessions
    • 5
    Register

    Dungeons and Dragons is one of the Oldest and most in depth Tabletop Role Playing Games in existence. This will be a running of The Curse of Strahd campaign module for DnD 5th Ed using a classic "Saturday morning cartoon flavoring". The sessions will be aimed at encouraging Teamwork, Creativity, and an expanding knowledge of Mathematics and Social Interaction. Sessions will last for 3 hours with a 10min break at the halfway point. Participants are asked to have voice capability for faster interaction. 

    Registration is by donation only; please give only if you can. We suggest $10/hour (so $30/week), though more is welcome and less is all right, as well. Any money we get beyond paying teachers and their expenses will be donated to charities supporting vulnerable populations at this time. If you have any questions about this policy or others, please contact us at courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org.

    Starting on Wednesday, April 15th, 4-7pm Eastern (3 hours)*

    D&D: Curse of Strahd

    Anthony Aguilar

    *Note that this is scheduled to be able to run for the next half year. We don't expect that to be the case and know that some of you cannot commit for that long or know that you will be stopping before that. This is not a reason to not join in! It's just that this is not designed with the same "just do a session" approach of the other Social Time offerings.
    • 15 Apr 2020
    • 14 May 2020
    • 5 sessions
    • 10
    Register

    The 3-D printer is the closest thing we have to the Star Trek replicator, and as prices have come down, it's become so affordable that pretty much anyone can get involved. If you're a newbie to printing, we'll go over the basics from FDM to SLA, PLA to PETG. If you're already involved in 3-D printing, we can chat about more advanced topics such as exotic materials (Nylon, don't fear it!) and 3-D design. We can also chat about current efforts to help with the shortage of personal protective equipment using 3-D printing.

    While the sessions are set up over a multi-week period, folks can join us for any number of sessions.

    Registration is by donation only; please give only if you can. Suggested donations are $10 per week. Any money we get beyond paying teachers and their expenses will be donated to charities supporting vulnerable populations at this time. If you have any questions about this policy or others, please contact us at courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org.


    Wednesday, April 15th, 6:00 - 7:00 pm Eastern 

    3D Printing

    James Turner





    • 16 Apr 2020
    • 07 May 2020
    • 4 sessions
    • 10
    Register

    A semi-structured relaxed time to get together, talk about books, TV shows, or movies; connect; and just be with each other, when we can't do it in person.

    While the sessions are set up over a four week period, folks can join us for any number of sessions.

    Registration is by donation only; please give only if you can. Suggested donations are $5, $10. or $15 for per week. The highest amounts cover facilitator costs. Any money we get beyond paying teachers and their expenses will be donated to charities supporting vulnerable populations at this time. If you have any questions about this policy or others, please contact us at courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org.


    Thursday, April 16th, 4:00 - 5:00 pm Eastern 

    SF & F Discussion

    Josh Shaine





    • 16 Apr 2020
    • 4:15 PM - 5:15 PM
    • 9
    Register

    A semi-structured relaxed time to get together, talk, play games, connect, and just be with each other, when we can't do it in person.

    Registration is by donation only.  If you wish to donate an amount other than the options, please select $0 and contact us at courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org.


    Thursday, April 16th, 4:15- 5:15 pm Eastern 

    Logic puzzles (part 3)

    Exploring some of my favorite online logic puzzles.

    Lisa Fontaine-Rainen





    • 16 Apr 2020
    • 14 May 2020
    • 5 sessions
    • 9
    Register

    Have stuff you want to go more deeply into? Whether it's saving the world, exploring concepts of death, trying to figure out why you are the way you are or to find meaning in life, we'll be willing to go there and discuss that.

    While the sessions are set up over a four week period, folks can join us for any number of sessions.

    Registration is by donation only; please give only if you can. Suggested donations are $5, $10. or $15 for per week. The highest amounts cover facilitator costs. Any money we get beyond paying teachers and their expenses will be donated to charities supporting vulnerable populations at this time. If you have any questions about this policy or others, please contact us at courses@giftedconferenceplanners.org.


    Thursday, April 16th, 5:30 - 6:30 pm Eastern 

    Serious Conversations About Stuff

    Josh Shaine





    • 24 Apr 2020
    • 8:30 AM
    • 26 Apr 2020
    • 4:30 PM
    • Boxboro Regency Hotel, Boxboro, MA 01719
    • 149
    Register

    Stories and Masques
    ________


    Keynote Speaker:

    P. Susan Jackson
    Director of the
    Daimon Institute for the Highly Gifted


    Special Guests:

    Abenas Kakira Bennett
    Abenas Ataa Bennett
    Directors of the
    Architects of Change Documentary


    Beyond IQ is the only conference series aimed explicitly at the needs of highly and profoundly gifted children, adolescents, and adults. Our Friday sessions are aimed at the professionals in this community, while they are joined by families and hg/pg individuals on the weekend for seminars, discussions, and social occasions. 

    • 01 Jun 2020
    • 03 Aug 2020
    • 10 sessions
    • Online
    Register


    Instructor: Josh Shaine
    3-12 students
    Suggested Age Ranges: 13+
    Meets: Mondays at 3:00pm ET, 10 weeks, starting June. 1st.

    Course Description

    What Science Fiction novels have you read that you think everybody else should read, too, if only so you have somebody to talk to about them?! What SF novels have you wanted to read, but just not gotten around to? The class will choose which books we will read during the term, then we'll explore them, with a different novel every two weeks

    There have been some outstanding films that help illustrate the principles of Science Fiction - exploring what makes them exemplars can be a blast!.

    “That movie was soooooooo bad! Gotta talk about it.” “Oh, but I thought it was great!”

    Everybody has an opinion, but they don’t all agree. We will look at some movies, old and new, good and bad, to discuss them in terms of Science Fiction, as well as in terms of how movies work or don’t. I hope to cover a movie per week. 

    Possible movies include 2001, Dark Star, Solaris, Back to the Future, Buckaroo Banzai, Jurassic Park, and many more. Some movies may be PG 13.



    Description of final project options for students:

    Students will craft a response to one or more of the works we have read, though it might be fiction rather than essay! (It might be music or artwork, for that matter.)

    Outline

    1. These are a few of my favorite books!
    2. Book One
    3. Movie One
    4. Book Two
    5. Movie Two and Discussion of Final Project
    6. Book Three
    7. Movie Three
    8. Book Four
    9. Movie Four
    10. Final Projects

    The students and I will share our creations, whether story, essay, art, or something else, during the last session.


    • 06 Aug 2020
    • 08 Aug 2020
    • 3 sessions
    • Boxboro Regency Hotel, Boxboro, MA 01719 or ONLINE
    • 150
    Register

    August 6 – 8, 2020


    Boxboro Regency Hotel and Conference Center, Boxborough, MA*


    Exploring the Theory of Positive Disintegration


    ________

    The 14th International Dabrowski Congress will be held in the town of Boxborough, Massachusetts.*

    The conference will be held at the Boxboro Regency, a comfortable venue at which you can stimulate your mind and pamper your senses.

    Theme: Using TPD in the Classroom, in Therapy, and in Research

    Keynote Speakers:

    Dr. Anna Mróz

    University of Zielona Góra

    Elizabeth Mika, M.A., LCPC

    Gifted Resources


Past events

07 Apr 2020 Social Time - Maze Rats RPG, 13+
06 Apr 2020 Social Time - Logic Puzzles, 13+
03 Apr 2020 Social Time - Minecraft Together, 13+
05 Feb 2020 We are all digital citizens here
05 Feb 2020 Should Cars Drive Themselves?
27 Jan 2020 Writing to Promote Change
27 Jan 2020 Creative Writing Labs
27 Jan 2020 Writing Bravery in The Hobbit
23 Jan 2020 The World of Benjamin Franklin
23 Jan 2020 Puzzle Masters
22 Jan 2020 Animals in Alice in Wonderland
21 Jan 2020 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
05 Sep 2019 Nonhuman Animals and Us
04 Sep 2019 Food: Culture, Health, Justice
27 Aug 2019 Exploring Intermediate Algebra
27 Aug 2019 Science, Philosophy, and Rationality: Bringing Light to His Dark Materials - PART 3 - The Amber Spyglass
26 Aug 2019 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 3
26 Aug 2019 Special Topics in Mathematics: Patterns and Algebra
17 Jun 2019 Science, Philosophy, and Rationality: Bringing Light to His Dark Materials - PART 2 - The Subtle Knife
17 Jun 2019 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 2
25 Mar 2019 Payment Plan 4
11 Mar 2019 Payment Plan 3
18 Feb 2019 Payment Plan 2
03 Feb 2019 Historical Geology
01 Feb 2019 How to Win (More Often) at Chess
01 Feb 2019 Project Planning: From Initial Idea to Polished Product
31 Jan 2019 Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration - Section 2
31 Jan 2019 Introduction to Chemistry
31 Jan 2019 Beyond Percy Jackson: The Greek (and Roman) Myths That Inspired the Novels
31 Jan 2019 Changing Life: Extinction, Evolution, Conservation
30 Jan 2019 The Hero’s Journey for Teens: Finding Your Mythic Story
30 Jan 2019 Science, Philosophy, and Rationality: Bringing Light to His Dark Materials
30 Jan 2019 Science: a Way of Knowing
30 Jan 2019 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
30 Jan 2019 Sketchbook Adventures
30 Jan 2019 How to Research like a Professor
29 Jan 2019 Chemistry II
29 Jan 2019 Writing to Promote Change
29 Jan 2019 Puzzlecraft: Creating a Puzzle Hunt
29 Jan 2019 Character Creation Lab
29 Jan 2019 Mathematical Explorations: Geometry I - Section 2
29 Jan 2019 Payment Plan 1
28 Jan 2019 Speculative Literature: Fantasy
28 Jan 2019 Money, Money, Money
28 Jan 2019 Talking Back to Stastistics
28 Jan 2019 Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration
28 Jan 2019 Mathematical Explorations: Geometry I
28 Jan 2019 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 2
06 Nov 2018 Election Day Math - 1 Hour session
06 Nov 2018 Election Day Math - 1/2 Section Registration
06 Nov 2018 Election Day Math
29 Aug 2018 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 3
27 Aug 2018 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
01 Jun 2018 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 3
27 Apr 2018 Scientific and Rational Thought & Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 2
14 Apr 2018 Girls Do Math - April Fools us with Logic!
03 Apr 2018 Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration - Spring Evening
03 Apr 2018 Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration - Spring Day
08 Mar 2018 Girls Do Math - March, Pi Day Challenges all month long!
26 Jan 2018 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
24 Jan 2018 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality PART 2
16 Jan 2018 Dabrowski's Theory of Positive Disintegration
16 Jan 2018 Parody and Satire 101
16 Jan 2018 Parody and Satire 101a
30 Oct 2017 Curriculum Modification for Gifted Children
16 Oct 2017 Current Events
08 Sep 2017 Parody and Satire 102
06 Sep 2017 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
14 Aug 2017 Giftedness and Underachievement
10 Jul 2017 Scientific and Rational Thought and Harry Potter and the Methods of Rationality
10 Jul 2017 Parody and Satire 101
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